2FA, U2F, OOB, and Other Terrifying Security Acronyms

February 2018 – US

Presented by Eric Mann (@ericmann)

Date: February 15, 2018
Time: 20:00 CST

18:00 PST, 3:00 CET (Feb. 16), 2:00 GMT (Feb. 16)
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In 2016, NIST announced it was deprecating SMS-based 2FA (second-factor authentication) from its Digital Authentication Guidance. As the internet works to harden application and online security, what are the proper options available for truly secure authentication? What are those OOB (out-of-band) transactions anyway? Why is identity security so hard? Learn about the tools that define the identity security landscape and how to easily integrate strong identity verification methods with your existing services. BYOA (bring your own acronyms).

Eric Mann

Eric Mann

Eric Mann is a seasoned web developer with experience in languages from JavaScript to Ruby to C#. He has been building websites of all shapes and sizes for the better part of a decade and continues to experiment with new technologies and techniques.

Eric is a Tekton working with Tozny (https://tozny.com) helping to engineer better, safer, more secure ways to identify yourself and control your information.

Developing Applications for Performance

February – EU 2018

Presented by Leon Fayer (@papa_fire)

Date: February 15, 2018
Time: 20:00 CET

19:00 GMT, 13:00 CST, 11:00 PST
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Scalability != performance. In fact, having to scale your architecture significantly with growth may be a symptom of a poor application performance. With the rise of the cloud and the abundance of automation and container tools that simplify scalability aspects of your system, performance considerations are often pushed to the back row. Building systems for high performance is not easy. It requires a lot of considerations—from technology selection to design decisions. In this talk, I’ll discuss common performance pitfalls across the stack and talk about useful techniques and examples that every application could benefit from.

Leon Fayer

Leon Fayer

Leon’s two decades of expertise have concentrated on architecting and operating complex, web-based systems to withstand crushing traffic (often unexpectedly). Over the years, he’s had a somewhat unique opportunity to design and build systems that run some of the most visited websites in the world. He’s considered a professional naysayer by peers and has the opinion that nothing really works until it works for at least a million people.

High Availability PHP

January 2018

Presented by Josh Butts (@jimbojsb)

Date: January 18, 2018
Time: 20:00 CST

18:00 PST, 3:00 CET (Jan 19), 2:00 GMT (Jan 19)
Not sure of the time in your area? Check it on timeanddate.com

With the rise of containerized applications, more and more people are starting to consider running high-availability applications in production with Docker. This is not to be taken lightly, and the path is fraught with peril. In this talk, we’ll discuss what a highly-available Docker-powered PHP environment looks like and how to build one. We’ll also look at strategies for using Docker and container concepts to avoid getting burned by “disposable” cloud hardware. We’ll look at load balancing, service discovery, failover and talk about tools that make these manageable. We’ll also talk about the speed at which the Docker ecosystem is moving, and how to cope with that when dealing with production applications.

Josh Butts

Josh Butts

Josh Butts is the VP of Engineering at Ziff Davis, an old publishing house that has “gone digital”. In addition to over a decade in the trenches of e-commerce at Offers.com, Josh also oversees engineering for other internet brands such as PCMag and Geek.com. Josh is also an organizer of Austin PHP, one of the largest PHP user groups in the US. Josh has taught several classes in PHP and enjoys the opportunity to share his experiences with the PHP community.

Tackling the Beast: How to Gradually
Upgrade a Legacy Code Base to PHP 7

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December

Presented by Ann Gaffigan (@anngaff)

Date: December 21, 2017
Time: 20:00 CST

18:00 PST, 3:00 CET (Dec 22), 2:00 GMT (Dec 22)
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Hypothetically speaking, what if you wanted to change all of the lightbulbs in your house to use LED bulbs, but your current wiring didn’t support LED bulbs? You would need to re-wire your house, which would take a long time. In the meantime, you wouldn’t have any working electricity. Is there a better way? What if there was an adapter that could transition LED to work with old wiring if necessary, or if the wiring was new, just work as usual? That’s a metaphor for how I figured out how to gradually upgrade a legacy (LAMP) code base to be compliant with PHP 7.0. Since PHP deprecated the MySQL extension functions as of PHP 5.5.0 and removed in 7.0, we needed to transition a LOT of code in a legacy system to use the modern MySQLi extension functions. In trying to figure out how to upgrade the code base without ceasing new development on the system, we decided to use an adapter database class to allow us to transition gradually. In this session, we’ll explain how the adapter class works and also the rules we put in place to ensure there was an end to the transition tunnel.

Ann Gaffigan

Ann Gaffigan

Ann Gaffigan is the CTO and partner at National Land Realty, a full-service real estate brokerage company specializing in farm, ranch, plantation, timber, and recreational land across the country. She was formerly the CTO of Land Pros Realty, which merged with National Land Realty in January 2016.

Ann spent the first decade of her career growing her web and systems development business, Gazelle Incorporated, after graduating from the University of Nebraska with her bachelor’s in computer science in 2004. Gazelle Inc. served dozens of clients all over the United States, ranging from small businesses that needed informational websites to larger non-profits and commercial businesses needing integrated membership and operations systems.

 

Implementing Serverless PHP

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December

Presented by Rob Allen (@akrabat)

Date: December 21, 2017
Time: 20:00 CET

19:00 GMT, 13:00 CST, 11:00 PST
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Serverless applications have a number of benefits and JavaScript is the most common language to write serverless functions in. Why not PHP? In this talk, I will discuss how I implemented first class PHP support into the Apache OpenWhisk platform. We’ll start by looking at OpenWhisk’s architecture and what happens when you invoke a function. Then, I’ll show you how I implemented the PHP support and walk though some example PHP serverless actions.

Rob Allen

Rob Allen

Rob Allen is a software consultant and developer with many years experience and writes code in PHP, Swift and other interesting languages. He leads Slim Framework’s development team and contributes to Apache OpenWhisk and other open source projects. Rob is a published author and based in the UK where he runs Nineteen Feet Limited, focussing on API development, training and consultancy. In his spare time, Rob blogs at akrabat.com and can often be seen with a camera in his hand.