The Container is a Lie!

May 2018

Presented by Larry Garfield (@Crell)

Date: May 17, 2018
Time: 20:00 CDT

18:00 PDT, 3:00 CEST (May 18), 2:00 BST (May 18)
Not sure of the time in your area? Check it on timeanddate.com

Containers are all the rage these days. They’re fast, they make deployment easy, they handle dependencies, they slice, they dice, they make julienne fries! But… what are they? What exactly is a container and how does it work? Just how does a container differ from the “old” silver bullet, virtual machines?

Here’s a hint: It has nothing to do with boats, or whales, or shipping. That’s all marketing fluff.

Containers are simply a shorthand name for leveraging newer features of operating system kernels that let the OS lie to programs about how they’re running. In fact, all of modern software is built on lies. That’s what’s useful about it!

To understand how that works, why it’s so useful, and where it’s not, let’s dive into how software actually works on a modern Linux system to see how those kernel features fit into the big picture, building up to “containers” along the way. Pull back the veil of lies and see how your computer really works.

Larry Garfield

Larry Garfield

Larry Garfield has been building websites since he was a sophomore in high school, which is longer ago than he’d like to admit. Larry was an active Drupal contributor and consultant for over a decade, and led the Drupal 8 Web Services initiative that helped transform Drupal into a modern PHP platform.

Larry is Director of Developer Experience at Platform.sh, a leading continuous
deployment cloud hosting company. He is also a member of the PHP-FIG Core
Committee.

Larry holds a Master’s degree in Computer Science from DePaul University. He blogs at both Platform.sh and GarfieldTech.com.

Mining Your Code for Efficient Documentation

April EU

Presented by Damien Seguy (@exakat)

Date: April 19, 2018
Time: 20:00 CEST

19:00 BST, 13:00 CDT, 11:00 PST
Not sure of the time in your area? Check it on timeanddate.com

In 2018, documenting code still feels very artisanal. Most of the work is done manually, and has trouble keeping up with the development pace. It is high time to start mining interesting data directly from the version control system. Precise technical docs, like PHP compilation and directives options; classes diagram and file dependencies help understand the essence of the code base. While high level manual has be written by a human for a human, automated tools prove to be of great help to improve code readability.

Damien Seguy

Damien Seguy

Damien Seguy is CTO at Exakat Ltd., a company specialized in PHP code quality solutions for the industry. He leads the development of the exakat PHP static analysis engine, that automatically audit code for version compatibility, security and auto-documentation. Since last millenium, Damien has contributed to PHP, as documentation author, elephpant breeder, conference speaker on every continents. He also enjoys machine learning, gremlin, 狮子头 and camembert

How to Use Generators to Beat Memory Bloat

April

Presented by Korvin Szanto (@korvinszanto)

Date: April 19, 2018
Time: 20:00 CDT

18:00 PDT, 3:00 CEST (Apr 20), 2:00 BST (Apr 20)
Not sure of the time in your area? Check it on timeanddate.com

Memory usage is something that we as developers have to be aware of. Ever debugging a memory issue and find that your once small dataset has ballooned out of proportion? And instead of dealing with the issue, you opt for upping the memory limit?

Iterators can be the answer but they require a lot of code and can be very difficult to understand at a glance. Thankfully since PHP 5.5 Generators help us create and manage what would be complex iterators with simple syntax sugar.

In this talk I will go over some of the ways you can implement generators and cure your memory bloat.

Korvin Szanto

Korvin Szanto

Korvin is an Open Source enthusiast who has been contributing to projects around the web since he could work a dial-up connection. He began his life as a developer asking questions on IRC, and eventually grew to answer them too! He is a maintainer of the open source concrete5 CMS, and works for PortlandLabs in Portland Oregon.