PHP & Web Development Blogs

Search Results For: multiple
Showing 1 to 5 of 13 blog articles.
20 views · 2 days ago

![Laravel Eloquent Relationship Part 2](https:/ /images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/3gY1sugUC3gTUtfgbhgNi5/410818aed6a8d4ea08e0ec796477291c/laravel_blog.png?w=1000)

As you all know, Laravel Eloquent Relationships are powerful and easy methods introduced by Laravel for helping developers to reduce the complexity when connecting with multiple tables. While connecting with multiple tables, this method is very easy for developers for creating the application

Here you can see the next three methods of the eloquent relationships:

1. Has Many Through Relationship

2. One to Many Polymorphic

3. Many to many Polymorphic

## HAS MANY THROUGH ELOQUENT RELATIONSHIP

Has many through is a little bit complicated while understanding. I will provide a shortcut method to provide access data of another mode relationship. We will create a user table, post table, and country table and they will be interconnected with each other.

Here we will see Many through relationship will use `hasManyThrough()` for the relation

### Create Migrations

**Users table**

```

Schema::create('users', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string('name');

$table->string('email')->unique();

$table->string('password');

$table->integer('country_id')->unsigned();

$table->rememberToken();

$table->timestamps();

$table->foreign('country_id')->references('id')->on('countries')

->onDelete('cascade');

});

```

**Posts table**

```

Schema::create('posts', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->integer('user_id')->unsigned();

$table->timestamps();

$table->foreign('user_id')->references('id')->on('users')

->onDelete('cascade');

});

```

**Countries table**

```

Schema::create('countries', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string('name');

$table->timestamps();

});

```

### Create Models

**Country Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Country extends Model

{

public function posts(){

return $this->hasManyThrough(

Post::class,

User::class,

'country_id', / / Foreign key on users table...

'user_id', / / Foreign key on posts table...

'id', / / Local key on countries table...

'id' / / Local key on users table...

);

}

}

```

**Now we can retrieve records by**

```

$country = Country::find(1);

dd($country->posts);

```

## ONE TO MANY POLYMORPHIC RELATIONSHIP

One to many polymorphic relationships used one model belongs to another model on a single file. For example, we will have tweets and blogs, both having the comment system. So we need to add the comments. Then we can manage both in a single table

Here we will use sync with a pivot table, create records, get all data, delete, update, and everything related to one too many relationships.

Now I will show one too many polymorphic will use `morphMany()` and `morphTo()` for relation.

### Create Migrations

**Posts table**

```

Schema::create('posts', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

**Videos Table**

```

Schema::create('videos', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

**Comments Table**

```

Schema::create('comments', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("body");

$table->integer('commentable_id');

$table->string("commentable_type");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

## Create Models

**Post Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Post extends Model

{

/ **

* Get all of the post's comments.

*/

public function comments(){

return $this->morphMany(Comment::class, 'commentable');

}

}

```

**Video Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Video extends Model{

/ **

* Get all of the post's comments.

*/

public function comments(){

return $this->morphMany(Comment::class, 'commentable');

}

}

```

**Comment Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Comment extends Model{

/ **

* Get all of the owning commentable models.

*/

public function commentable(){

return $this->morphTo();

}

}

```

### Create Records

```

$post = Post::find(1);

$comment = new Comment;

$comment->body = "Hi Harikrishnan";

$post->comments()->save($comment);

/ / Video

$video = Video::find(1);

$comment = new Comment;

$comment->body = "Hi Harikrishnan";

$video->comments()->save($comment);

```

Now we can retrieve records

```

$post = Post::find(1);

dd($post->comments);

$video = Video::find(1);

dd($video->comments);

```

## MANY TO MANY POLYMORPHIC RELATIONSHIPS

Many to many polymorphic is also a little bit complicated like above. If we have a tweet, video and tag table, we need to connect each table like every tweet and video will have multiple persons to tag. And for each and every tag there will be multiple tweet or videos.

Here we can understand the creating of many to many polymorphic relationships, with a foreign key schema of one to many relationships, use sync with a pivot table, create records, attach records, get all records, delete, update, where condition and etc..

Here `morphToMany()` and `morphedByMany()` will be used for many to many polymorphic relationships

### Creating Migrations

**Posts Table**

```

Schema::create('posts', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

**Videos Table**

```

Schema::create('videos', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

**Tags table**

```

Schema::create('tags', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

**Taggables table**

```

Schema::create('taggables', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->integer("tag_id");

$table->integer("taggable_id");

$table->string("taggable_type");

});

```

### Creating Models

**Post Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Post extends Model

{

/ **

* Get all of the tags for the post.

*/

public function tags(){

return $this->morphToMany(Tag::class, 'taggable');

}

}

```

**Video Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Video extends Model

{

/ **

* Get all of the tags for the post.

*/

public function tags(){

return $this->morphToMany(Tag::class, 'taggable');

}

}

```

**Tag Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Tag extends Model

{

/ **

* Get all of the posts that are assigned this tag.

*/

public function posts(){

return $this->morphedByMany(Post::class, 'taggable');

}

/ **

* Get all of the videos that are assigned this tag.

*/

public function videos(){

return $this->morphedByMany(Video::class, 'taggable');

}

}

```

**Creating Records**

```

$post = Post::find(1);

$tag = new Tag;

$tag->name = "Hi Harikrishnan";

$post->tags()->save($tag);

$video = Video::find(1);

$tag = new Tag;

$tag->name = "Vishnu";

$video->tags()->save($tag);

$post = Post::find(1);

$tag1 = new Tag;

$tag1->name = "Kerala Blasters";

$tag2 = new Tag;

$tag2->name = "Manajapadda";

$post->tags()->saveMany([$tag1, $tag2]);

$video = Video::find(1);

$tag1 = new Tag;

$tag1->name = "Kerala Blasters";

$tag2 = new Tag;

$tag2->name = "Manajappada";

$video->tags()->saveMany([$tag1, $tag2]);

$post = Post::find(1);

$tag1 = Tag::find(3);

$tag2 = Tag::find(4);

$post->tags()->attach([$tag1->id, $tag2->id]);

$video = Video::find(1);

$tag1 = Tag::find(3);

$tag2 = Tag::find(4);

$video->tags()->attach([$tag1->id, $tag2->id]);

$post = Post::find(1);

$tag1 = Tag::find(3);

$tag2 = Tag::find(4);

$post->tags()->sync([$tag1->id, $tag2->id]);

$video = Video::find(1);

$tag1 = Tag::find(3);

$tag2 = Tag::find(4);

$video->tags()->sync([$tag1->id, $tag2->id]);

```

Now we can retrieve records

```

$post = Post::find(1);

dd($post->tags);

$video = Video::find(1);

dd($video->tags)

$tag = Tag::find(1);

dd($tag->posts);

$tag = Tag::find(1);

dd($tag->videos);

```

Hence we completed all the relationships. In the above blog how has many through relationship, one to many polymorphic relationships and many to many polymorphic are working. This feature is introduced from Laravel 5.0 onwards and till the current version. Without the model, we can’t able to do this relationship. If we are using an eloquent relationship it will be very useful while developing an application.

13 views · 2 days ago

![](https:/ /cdn.filestackcontent.com/Ve0Q3jp4S4KuL2N4Mub7)

#### Welcome back! If you’re new to this series have a look at [Part 1 here](https:/ /nomadphp.com/blog/1925/code-with-me-challenge-custom-cms-development-with-php-and-mysql)

Today’s focus is on templating, the aesthetic that will make or break your web application.

Having a clean design with well defined CSS that’s responsive and user friendly goes a long way.

Developers often stick to their lane but delving into templating will bode in your favor, you can indeed

create a functional and launch-worthy application all on your own!

Let’s jump into it!

## Structured structure

Everything you tackle should be found with ease down the line. Therefore careful planning is fundamental to the success and sustainability of your project. You’ll also find that clearly defining your work lends itself to more productivity overall as you spend less that explaining your work during a handover / looking for a specific piece of code or resource. You’ll probably end up spending more time on actual work.

Finding your own unique pattern with file structure and CSS identifiers will also work in your favor as something unique to your process will most likely be easier to remember and form a tactile relationship with.

Our project’s current structure looks like this:

![](https:/ /cdn.filestackcontent.com/yvGBC8qbRMmsHklihrq2)

>If you need to backtrack, [Part 1](https:/ /nomadphp.com/blog/1925/code-with-me-challenge-custom-cms-development-with-php-and-mysql) is a great place to start!

In part 1, we created our index.php which displays info from our database.

Let’s take this a step further and create a header and a footer for our index.php

Create a file called header.php and save this to your includes folder.

Next, create a file called footer.php and save this to your includes folder.

Your file structure should now look like this.

![](https:/ /cdn.filestackcontent.com/8xTDBQkrTtSoZHC1aW5o)

### A header above all the rest

The header file will be a file we reuse throughout your web application. This file will contain important information that’s vital to the functionality and aesthetic of your website.

The type of info you’ll expect to see in a header.php file:

Script includes

Such as JQuery and important libraries

CSS includes

CSS files loaded from internal or external sources

Meta information

Contains important information that’s readable by search engines.

The basic structure of the beginning of your app, including your menu, and your logo.

For now, how header is going to have a basic layout.

Let’s get our HTML on!

```

<html>

<head>

<title>My Awesome CMS – Page Title</title>

</head>

<body>

```

### A footer that sets the bar

Create a file called footer.php and save it to your includes folder (yourcms/includes/footer.php).

Add this code to your new file.

```

</body>

</html>

```

### Next, let’s focus on the gravy… The CSS

CSS, when written beautifully, can truly set you apart.

You can tell your web application to load various styles to specific elements by defining unique identifiers.

Styles that are only used once are denoted with a # (a CSS “ID”) whereas styles that are reused multiple times are denoted with a . (a CSS “class”)

The best way to delve into the realm of CSS is to learn by experience.

### Let’s create!

First, we need to create and load our CSS file. Remember our nifty new pal header.php? This created a convenient way to load our CSS file!

Add the following code to your header.php just above the `</head>` tag.

```

<link href=”../assets/css/style.css” type=”text/css” rel=”stylesheet”/>

```

The ../ in the link to our stylesheet means we have to leave the current directory (the directory that header.php is in) and look for the assets/css/ directories.

Go ahead and create the css folder under your assets folder.

Next we’re going to create some simple CSS to test things out.

### It’s time to add some style!

We are going to create two divs.

A div is a divider / section in HTML.

Add this to your index.php (located in your CMS’ root folder) above the `<?php` tag.

```

<div id="myfirstid"></div>

<div class="myfirstclass"></div>

<div class="myfirstclass"></div>

<div class="myfirstclass"></div>

<div class="myfirstclass"></div>

<div class="myfirstclass"></div>

```

Then, create a CSS file

Add this:

```

#myfirstid{

Background:lightblue;

Font-family:Arial;

Font-size:44px;

Font-weight: Bold;

}

.myfirstclass{

Font-size:15px;

Color: darkblue;

}

```

Save your newly created CSS to assets/css/ as style.css.

### Pulling it all together, let’s see what we can do!

Let’s apply what we just learned to our index.php. But first, we should add our header.php and footer.php files.

### Including everyone

Add this to the top of your index.php file:

```

include(‘includes/header.php’);

```

Remove the `<divs>` we used for practice earlier, we have something better in store!

Add this to the bottom of your index.php:

```

include(‘includes/footer.php’);

```

Next, let’s modify our code so we can add some style to the data we retrieve from our database.

Modify the following line:

```

foreach($getmydata as $mydata){ echo "Title: "; echo $mydata['title']; echo "<br/>"; echo "Content: "; echo $mydata['content']; echo "<br/>"; echo "Author: "; echo $mydata['author']; echo "<br/>"; echo "<br/>";

```

as follows:

```

?>

<div id=”myfirstid”>

<?php

foreach($getmydata as $mydata){

echo "<div class=”myfirstclass”>Title: ";

echo $mydata['title'];

echo "<br/>";

echo "Content: ";

echo $mydata['content'];

echo "<br/>";

echo "Author: ";

echo $mydata['author'];

echo "</div><br/><br/>";

}?>

</div>

<?php

```

Your full index.php should now look like this:

```

<?php

include('includes/header.php');

include('includes/conn.php');

if ($letsconnect -> connect_errno) { echo "Error " . $letsconnect -> connect_error;

}else{

$getmydata=$letsconnect -> query("SELECT * FROM content");

?>

<div id="myfirstid">

<?php

foreach($getmydata as $mydata){

echo "<div class=”myfirstclass”>Title: ";

echo $mydata['title'];

echo "<br/>";

echo "Content: ";

echo $mydata['content'];

echo "<br/>";

echo "Author: ";

echo $mydata['author'];

echo "</div><br/><br/>";

}

?>

</div>

<?php

}

$letsconnect -> close();

include('includes/footer.php');

?>

```

## Go ahead, test it out!

There’s a lot to unpack and I will break things down a little more during our next tutorial!

## Challenge

Study the final index.php and try to form a few theories about why closing a php tag is necessary before adding raw html.

## Next Up: #CodeWithMe Part 4: Building A Good Base

3355 views · 12 months ago

![Why Cloudways is the Perfect Managed Hosting for PHP Applications](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/3VLCUBagZPfSLyxyt1AvvP/89e3b904a450454545eb885e2e0e76b4/cloudways.jpg?w=1000)

#### The following is a sponsored blogpost by [Cloudways](https://www.cloudways.com/en/?id=431739)

Developing an application is not the sole thing you should bank on. You must strive to find the best hosting solution to deploy that application also. The application’s speed is dependent on the hosting provider, that is why I always advise you to go for the best hosting solution to get the ultimate app performance.

Now a days, it is a big challenge to choose any web hosting, as each hosting has its own pros and cons which you must know, before considering it finally for the deployment. I don’t recommend shared hosting for PHP/Laravel based applications, because you always get lot of server hassles like downtime, hacking, 500 errors, lousy support and other problems that are part and parcel of shared hosting.

For PHP applications, you must focus on more technical aspects like caching, configs, databases, etc. because these are essential performance points for any vanilla or framework-based PHP application. Additionally, if the app focuses on user engagement (for instance, ecommerce store), the hosting solution should be robust enough to handle spikes in traffic.

Here, I would like to introduce Cloudways [PHP server hosting](https://www.cloudways.com/en/php-cloud-hosting.php?id=431739) to you which provides easy, developer and designer friendly managed hosting platform. With Cloudways, you don't need to focus on PHP hosting, but must focus on building your application. You can easily launch cloud servers on five providers including DigitalOcean, Linode, Vultr, AWS and GCE.

### Cloudways ThunderStack

Being a developer, you must be familiar with the concept of stack - an arrangement of technologies that form the underlying hosting solution.

To provide a blazing fast speed and a glitch-free performance, Cloudways has built a PHP stack, known as ThunderStack. This stack consists of technologies that offer maximum uptime and page load speed to all PHP applications. Check out the following visual representation of ThunderStack and the constituent technologies:

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/5v08m0nwsFPv7niXjmRX0M/ca3aba8d814578baf676bd58c3933dc8/cloudways_image1.png?w=1000)

As you can see, ThunderStack comprises of a mix of static and dynamic caches with two web servers, Nginx and Apache. This combination ensures the ultimate experience for the users and visitors of your application.

### Frameworks and CMS

The strength and popularity of PHP lies in the variety of frameworks and CMS it offers to the developers. Realizing this diversity, Cloudways offers a hassle-free installation of major PHP frameworks including Symfony, Laravel, CakePHP, Zend, and Codeigniter. Similarly, popular CMS such as WordPress, Bolt, Craft, October, Couch, and Coaster CMS - you can install these with the 1-click option. The best part is that if you have a framework or CMS that is not on the list, you can easily install it through Composer.

### 1-Click PHP Server & Application Installation

Setting up a stack on an unmanaged VPS could take an entire day!

When you opt for Cloudways managed cloud hosting, the entire process of setting up the server, installation of core PHP files and then the setup of the required framework is over in a matter of minutes.

Just [sign up at Cloudways](https://www.cloudways.com/en/?id=431739), choose your desired cloud provider, and select the PHP stack application.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/2Dp11Kg9FOkHkFbjUub7Tj/f0c4c125a8c683c51a548fdd287c8330/cloudways_image2.png?w=1000)

As you can see, your LAMP stack is ready for business in minutes.

Many PHP applications fail because essential services are either turned off or not set up properly. Cloudways offers a centralized location where you can view and set the status of all essential services such as:

* Apache

* Elasticsearch

* Memcached

* MySQL

* PHP-FPM

* Nginx

* New Relic

* Redis

* Varnish

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/1zvZI0b7zuPbBacp4ALAax/a5150babfbe2972c96beca3ac71395f2/cloudways_image3.png?w=1000)

Similarly, you can manage SMTP add-ons without any fuss.

### Staging Environment

With Cloudways, you can test your web applications for possible bugs and errors before taking it live.

Using the staging feature, developers can first deploy their web sites on test domains where they can analyze the applications performance and potential problems. This helps site administrators to fix those issues timely and view the application performance in real-time.

A default sub domain comes pre-installed with the newly launched application, making it easy for the administrators to test the applications on those testing subdomains. Overall, it's a great feature which helps developers know about the possible errors that may arise during the live deployment.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/5gTrIsw9KjhocjtZMWVePB/a8274899ee55d7068329c551af362fdf/cloudways_image4.png?w=1000)

### Pre-Installed Composer & Git

PHP development requires working with external libraries and packages. Suppose you are working with Laravel and you need to install an external package. Since Composer has become the standard way of installing packages, it comes preinstalled on the Cloudways platform. Just launch the application and start using Composer in your project.

Similarly, if you are familiar with Git and maintain your project on GitHub or BitBucket, you don’t need to worry about Git installation. Git also comes pre-configured on Cloudways. You can start running commands right after application launch.

### Cloudways MySQL Manager

When you work with databases in PHP, you need a database manager. On the Cloudways platform, you will get a custom-built MySQL manager, in which you can perform all the tasks of a typical DB manager.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/415qced8tKK8FWEsWGPhAm/ec1947d0b21ac8cd572613d0a1fa88dc/cloudways_image5.png?w=1000)

However, if you wish to install and use another database manager like PHPMyAdmin, you can install it by following this simple guide on installing [PHPMyadmin](https://www.cloudways.com/blog/installation-phpmyadmin/?id=431739).

### Server & Application Level SSH

If you use Linux, you typically use SSH for accessing the server(s) and individual applications. A third-party developer requires application and server level access as per the requirements of the client. Cloudways offers SSH access to fit the requirements of the client and users.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/1IpSR4TrckMFJjYQ1m5upz/030f71f106b7db97ce16de10aba2c17b/cloudways_image6.png?w=1000)

### PHP-FPM, Varnish & Cron Settings

Cloudways provides custom UI panel to set and maintain PHP-FPM and Varnish settings. Although the default configuration is already in place, you can easily change all the settings to suit your own, particular development related requirements. In Varnish settings, you can define URL that you want to exclude from caching. You can also set permissions in this panel.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/2W8XQvGa3CZAPBwUY4sqca/8a6b041c6dc850cc2715bb19eb17a464/cloudways_image7.png?w=1000)

Cron job is a very commonly used component of PHP application development process. On Cloudways platform, you can easily set up Cron jobs in just a few clicks. Just declare the PHP script URL and the time when the script will run.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/32fN2IkC1X3HEC2Ly685nz/6fb9607bab9beaa81bff1b7fe4061edf/cloudways_image8.png?w=1000)

### Cloudways API & Personal Assistant Bot

Cloudways provides an internal API that offers all important aspects of the server and application management. Through Cloudways API, you can easily develop, integrate, automate, and manage your servers and web apps on Cloudways Platform using the RESTful API. Check out some of the [use cases developed](https://www.cloudways.com/blog/category/use-cases/api/?id=431739) using Cloudways API. You just need your API key and email for authentication of the HTTP calls on API Playground and custom applications.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/5Uxx5XySaV2um2AnJjvbcg/0a4e997995d6644aa90c850a41db2720/cloudways_image9.png?w=1000)

Cloudways employs a smart assistant named CloudwaysBot to notify all users about server and application level issues. CloudwaysBot sends the notifications on pre-approved channels including email, Slack and popular task management tools such as Asana and Trello.

### Run Your APIs on PHP Stack

Do you have your own API which you want to run on the PHP stack? No problem, because you can do that, too with Cloudways! You can also use REST API like [Slim](https://www.cloudways.com/blog/simple-rest-api-with-slim-micro-framework/?id=431739&utm_source=phpjabber&utm_medium=referral), [Silex](https://www.cloudways.com/blog/create-rest-api-silex/?utm_source=phpjabber&utm_medium=referral&id=431739), [Lumen](https://www.cloudways.com/blog/creating-rest-api-with-lumen/?utm_source=phpjabber&utm_medium=referral&id=431739), and others. You can use APIs to speed up performance and require fast servers with lots of resources. So, if you think that your API response time is getting slower due to the large number of requests, you can easily scale your server(s) with a click to address the situation.

### Team Collaboration

When you work on a large number of applications with multiple developers, you need to assign them on any specific application. Cloudways provides an awesome feature of team collaboration through which you can assign developers to specific application and give access to them. You can use this tool to assign one developer to multiple applications. Through team feature, you can connect the team together and work on single platform. Access can be of different type; i.e. billing, support and console. You can either give the full access or a limited one by selecting the features in Team tab.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/3Yn7GSeHrLvSbPf42RTR2n/269328c371e80f3ac87984cf46b6e9ac/cloudways_image10.png?w=1000)

### Final Words

Managed cloud hosting ensures that you are not bothered by any hosting or server related issues. For practical purposes, this means that developers can concentrate on writing awesome code without worrying about underlying infrastructure and hosting related issues. Do [sign up](https://www.cloudways.com/en/?id=431739) and check out Cloudways for the best and the most cost-effective cloud hosting solution for your next PHP project!

5517 views · 12 months ago

![PHP CHAT WITH SOCKETS](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/71dBtxsZPdBnAn8UgQTyRR/75ca0c2ab27af41ffc82b17d1be264d7/AdobeStock_265642631.jpeg?w=1000)

Hey Friends,

I am sharing a very interesting blog on how to create a chat system in php without using ajax. As we all know ajax based chat system in php is not a good solution

because it **increases the server load and redundant xhr calls** on our server.

Instead, I am going to use sockets for incoming messages from and send messages to another user. So lets try them out using the following steps:

### Step 1: Cross check in php.ini that sockets extension is enabled

```

;extension=sockets

/ /remove semicolon from very start of the extension like

extension=sockets

```

### Step 2: Create `server.php` file

This file will handle the incoming and outgoing messages on sockets, Add following variables in top of the file:

```php

$host = 'localhost'; / /host

$port = '9000'; / /port

$null = NULL; / /null var

```

### Step 3: After it add helper methods

The following code for handshake with new incoming connections and encrypt and decrypt messages incoming and outgoing over sockets:

```php

function send_message($msg)

{

global $clients;

foreach($clients as $changed_socket)

{

@socket_write($changed_socket,$msg,strlen($msg));

}

return true;

}

/ /Unmask incoming framed message

function unmask($text) {

$length = ord($text[1]) & 127;

if($length == 126) {

$masks = substr($text, 4, 4);

$data = substr($text, 8);

}

elseif($length == 127) {

$masks = substr($text, 10, 4);

$data = substr($text, 14);

}

else {

$masks = substr($text, 2, 4);

$data = substr($text, 6);

}

$text = "";

for ($i = 0; $i < strlen($data); ++$i) {

$text .= $data[$i] ^ $masks[$i%4];

}

return $text;

}

/ /Encode message for transfer to client.

function mask($text)

{

$b1 = 0x80 | (0x1 & 0x0f);

$length = strlen($text);

if($length <= 125)

$header = pack('CC', $b1, $length);

elseif($length > 125 && $length < 65536)

$header = pack('CCn', $b1, 126, $length);

elseif($length >= 65536)

$header = pack('CCNN', $b1, 127, $length);

return $header.$text;

}

/ /handshake new client.

function perform_handshaking($receved_header,$client_conn, $host, $port)

{

$headers = array();

$lines = preg_split("/

/", $receved_header);

foreach($lines as $line)

{

$line = chop($line);

if(preg_match('/\A(\S+): (.*)\z/', $line, $matches))

{

$headers[$matches[1]] = $matches[2];

}

}

$secKey = $headers['Sec-WebSocket-Key'];

$secAccept = base64_encode(pack('H*', sha1($secKey . '258EAFA5-E914-47DA-95CA-C5AB0DC85B11')));

/ /hand shaking header

$upgrade = "HTTP/1.1 101 Web Socket Protocol Handshake

" .

"Upgrade: websocket

" .

"Connection: Upgrade

" .

"WebSocket-Origin: $host

" .

"WebSocket-Location: ws:/ /$host:$port/php-ws/chat-daemon.php

".

"Sec-WebSocket-Accept:$secAccept

";

socket_write($client_conn,$upgrade,strlen($upgrade));

}

```

### Step 4: Now add following code to create bind and listen tcp/ip sockets:

```php

/ /Create TCP/IP stream socket

$socket = socket_create(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, SOL_TCP);

/ /reuseable port

socket_set_option($socket, SOL_SOCKET, SO_REUSEADDR, 1);

/ /bind socket to specified host

socket_bind($socket, 0, $port);

/ /listen to port

socket_listen($socket);

/ /create & add listning socket to the list

$clients = array($socket);

```

Ok now a endless loop that will use for handeling incominga nd send messages:

```php

/ /start endless loop, so that our script doesn't stop

while (true) {

/ /manage multiple connections

$changed = $clients;

/ /returns the socket resources in $changed array

socket_select($changed, $null, $null, 0, 10);

/ /check for new socket

if (in_array($socket, $changed)) {

$socket_new = socket_accept($socket); / /accpet new socket

$clients[] = $socket_new; / /add socket to client array

$header = socket_read($socket_new, 1024); / /read data sent by the socket

perform_handshaking($header, $socket_new, $host, $port); / /perform websocket handshake

socket_getpeername($socket_new, $ip); / /get ip address of connected socket

$response = mask(json_encode(array('type'=>'system', 'message'=>$ip.' connected'))); / /prepare json data

send_message($response); / /notify all users about new connection

/ /make room for new socket

$found_socket = array_search($socket, $changed);

unset($changed[$found_socket]);

}

/ /loop through all connected sockets

foreach ($changed as $changed_socket) {

/ /check for any incomming data

while(socket_recv($changed_socket, $buf, 1024, 0) >= 1)

{

$received_text = unmask($buf); / /unmask data

$tst_msg = json_decode($received_text, true); / /json decode

$user_name = $tst_msg['name']; / /sender name

$user_message = $tst_msg['message']; / /message text

$user_color = $tst_msg['color']; / /color

/ /prepare data to be sent to client

$response_text = mask(json_encode(array('type'=>'usermsg', 'name'=>$user_name, 'message'=>$user_message, 'color'=>$user_color)));

send_message($response_text); / /send data

break 2; / /exist this loop

}

$buf = @socket_read($changed_socket, 1024, PHP_NORMAL_READ);

if ($buf === false) { / / check disconnected client

/ / remove client for $clients array

$found_socket = array_search($changed_socket, $clients);

socket_getpeername($changed_socket, $ip);

unset($clients[$found_socket]);

/ /notify all users about disconnected connection

$response = mask(json_encode(array('type'=>'system', 'message'=>$ip.' disconnected')));

send_message($response);

}

}

}

/ / close the listening socket

socket_close($socket);

```

So you are ready with server side socket program, Now its time to move on front side where we will implement w3c provided client side Web Socket Apis,

### Step 5: create a file named index.php for frontend usage with following initial code

```php

$host = 'localhost'; / /host

$port = '9000'; / /port

$subfolder = "php_ws/"; / /project subfolder name, you may change it with project directory or make it blank

/ /#add trail slash if there is any subfolder defined otherrwise make it blank

$colors = array('#007AFF','#FF7000','#FF7000','#15E25F','#CFC700','#CFC700','#CF1100','#CF00BE','#F00');

$color_pick = array_rand($colors);

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>

<head>

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">

</head>

<body>

<div class="chat-wrapper">

<div id="message-box"></div>

<div class="user-panel">

<input type="text" name="name" id="name" placeholder="Your Name" maxlength="15" />

<input type="text" name="message" id="message" placeholder="Type your message here..." maxlength="100" />

<button id="send-message">Send</button>

</div>

</div>

</body>

</html>

```

Now add some basic styling in the head section using following code:

```html

<style type="text/css">

.chat-wrapper {

font: bold 11px/normal 'lucida grande', tahoma, verdana, arial, sans-serif;

background: #00a6bb;

padding: 20px;

margin: 20px auto;

box-shadow: 2px 2px 2px 0px #00000017;

max-width:700px;

min-width:500px;

}

#message-box {

width: 97%;

display: inline-block;

height: 300px;

background: #fff;

box-shadow: inset 0px 0px 2px #00000017;

overflow: auto;

padding: 10px;

}

.user-panel{

margin-top: 10px;

}

input[type=text]{

border: none;

padding: 5px 5px;

box-shadow: 2px 2px 2px #0000001c;

}

input[type=text]#name{

width:20%;

}

input[type=text]#message{

width:60%;

}

button#send-message {

border: none;

padding: 5px 15px;

background: #11e0fb;

box-shadow: 2px 2px 2px #0000001c;

}

</style>

```

Ok Style is all set now need to add a jquery script and create web socket object and handle all events on it as following code need to add before closing of bosy tag:

```html

<script src="https:/ /ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">

/ /create a new WebSocket object.

var msgBox = $('#message-box');

var wsUri = "ws:/ /".$host.":".$port."/php-ws/server.php";

websocket = new WebSocket(wsUri);

websocket.onopen = function(ev) { / / connection is open

msgBox.append('<div class="system_msg" style="color:#bbbbbb">Welcome to my "Chat box"!</div>'); / /notify user

}

/ / Message received from server

websocket.onmessage = function(ev) {

var response = JSON.parse(ev.data); / /PHP sends Json data

var res_type = response.type; / /message type

var user_message = response.message; / /message text

var user_name = response.name; / /user name

var user_color = response.color; / /color

switch(res_type){

case 'usermsg':

msgBox.append('<div><span class="user_name" style="color:' + user_color + '">' + user_name + '</span> : <span class="user_message">' + user_message + '</span></div>');

break;

case 'system':

msgBox.append('<div style="color:#bbbbbb">' + user_message + '</div>');

break;

}

msgBox[0].scrollTop = msgBox[0].scrollHeight; / /scroll message

};

websocket.onerror = function(ev){ msgBox.append('<div class="system_error">Error Occurred - ' + ev.data + '</div>'); };

websocket.onclose = function(ev){ msgBox.append('<div class="system_msg">Connection Closed</div>'); };

/ /Message send button

$('#send-message').click(function(){

send_message();

});

/ /User hits enter key

$( "#message" ).on( "keydown", function( event ) {

if(event.which==13){

send_message();

}

});

/ /Send message

function send_message(){

var message_input = $('#message'); / /user message text

var name_input = $('#name'); / /user name

if(message_input.val() == ""){ / /empty name?

alert("Enter your Name please!");

return;

}

if(message_input.val() == ""){ / /emtpy message?

alert("Enter Some message Please!");

return;

}

/ /prepare json data

var msg = {

message: message_input.val(),

name: name_input.val(),

color : '<?php echo $colors[$color_pick]; ?>'

};

/ /convert and send data to server

websocket.send(JSON.stringify(msg));

message_input.val(''); / /reset message input

}

</script>

```

Ok All set, Now need to run the server.php file using following php-cli utility,make sure you have php cli utility installed in your system:


```

php -q c:\xampp\htdocs\php-ws\server.php

```

Now you may access the front index.php file via the browser url like following and see a chatbox and connection status, you may use the same url or different browser to check the chat system is working or not.

5435 views · 1 years ago

![Introduction to Gitlab CI for PHP developers](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/5EUoVwcn2inEG3LsNJFAYp/14e5c704d91665c0de6ffd506a283ec3/AdobeStock_90389954.png?w=1000)

As a developer, you've probably at least heard something about [CI - Continuous integration](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuous_integration). And if you haven't - you better fix it ASAP, because that's something awesome to have on your skill list and can get extremely helpful in your everyday work. This post will focus on CI for PHP devs, and specifically, on CI implementation from [Gitlab](https://docs.gitlab.com/ee/ci/README.html). I will suppose you know the basics of [Git](https://git-scm.com/), [PHP](https://php.net/), [PHPUnit](https://phpunit.de/), [Docker](https://www.docker.com/) and unix shell. Intended audience - intermediate PHP devs.

Adding something to your workflow must serve a purpose. In this case the goal is to automate routine tasks and achieve better quality control. Even a basic PHP project IMO needs the following:

* [linter](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lint_(software)) checks (cannot merge changes that are invalid on the syntax level)

* Code style checks

* Unit and integration tests

All of those can be just run eventually, of course. But I prefer an automated CI approach even in my personal projects because it leads to a higher level of discipline, you simply can't avoid following a set of rules that you've developed. Also, it reduces a risk of releasing a bug or regression, thus improving quality.

Gitlab is as generous as giving you their CI for free, even for your private repos. At this point it is starting to look as advertising, therefore a quick comparison table for [Gitlab](https://about.gitlab.com/pricing/), Github, [Bitbucket](https://bitbucket.org/product/pricing). AFAIK, Github does not have a built-in solution, instead it is easily integrated with third parties, of which [Travis CI](https://github.com/marketplace/travis-ci/plan/MDIyOk1hcmtldHBsYWNlTGlzdGluZ1BsYW43MA==#pricing-and-setup) seems to be the most popular - I will therefore mention Travis here.

### Public repositories (OSS projects). All 3 providers have a free offer for the open-source community!

| Provider | Limits |

|---|---|

| Gitlab | 2,000 CI pipeline minutes per group per month, shared runners |

| Travis | Apparently unlimited |

| Bitbucket| 50 min/month, max 5 users, File storage <= 1Gb/month |

### Private repositories

| Provider | Price | Limits |

|---|---|---|

| Gitlab | Free | 2,000 CI pipeline minutes per group per month, shared runners |

| Travis | $69/month | Unlimited builds, 1 job at a time |

| Bitbucket| Free | 50 min/month, max 5 users, File storage <= 1Gb/month |

## Getting started

I made a small project based on Laravel framework and called it "ci-showcase". I work in Linux environment, and the commands I use in the examples, are for linux shell. They should be pretty much the same on Mac and nearly the same on Windows though.

```sh

composer create-project laravel/laravel ci-showcase

```

Next, I went to gitlab website and created a new public project: https://gitlab.com/crocodile2u/ci-showcase. Cloned the repo and copied all files and folders from the newly created project - the the new git repo. In the root folder, I placed a `.gitignore` file:

```

.idea

vendor

.env

```

Then the `.env` file:

```

APP_ENV=development

```

Then I generated the application encryption key: `php artisan key:generate`, and then I wanted to verify that the primary setup works as expected: `./vendor/bin/phpunit`, which produced the output `OK (2 tests, 2 assertions)`. Nice, time to commit this: `git commit && git push`

[At this point](https://gitlab.com/crocodile2u/ci-showcase/tree/step-1), we don't yet have any CI, let's do something about it!

### Adding .gitlab-ci.yml

Everyone going to implement CI with Gitlab, is strongly encouraged to bookmark this page: https://docs.gitlab.com/ee/ci/README.html. I will simply provide a short introduction course here plus a bit of boilerplate code to get you started easier.

First QA check that we're going to add is PHP syntax check. PHP has a built-in linter, which you can invoke like this: `php -l my-file.php`. This is what we're going to use. Because the `php -l` command doesn't support multiple files as arguments, I've written a small wrapper shell script and saved it to `ci/linter.sh`:

```sh

#!/bin/sh

files=`sh ci/get-changed-php-files.sh | xargs`

last_status=0

status=0

# Loop through changed PHP files and run php -l on each

for f in "$files" ; do message=`php -l $f` last_status="$?" if [ "$last_status" -ne "0" ]; then # Anything fails -> the whole thing fails echo "PHP Linter is not happy about $f: $message" status="$last_status" fi

done

if [ "$status" -ne "0" ]; then echo "PHP syntax validation failed!"

fi

exit $status

```

Most of the time, you don't actually want to check each and every PHP file that you have. Instead, it's better to check only those files that have been changed. The Gitlab pipeline runs on every push to the repository, and there is a way to know which PHP files have been changed. Here's a simple script, meet `ci/get-changed-php-files.sh`:

```sh

#!/bin/sh

# What's happening here?

#

# 1. We get names and statuses of files that differ in current branch from their state in origin/master.

# These come in form (multiline)

# 2. The output from git diff is filtered by unix grep utility, we only need files with names ending in .php

# 3. One more filter: filter *out* (grep -v) all lines starting with R or D.

# D means "deleted", R means "renamed"

# 4. The filtered status-name list is passed on to awk command, which is instructed to take only the 2nd part

# of every line, thus just the filename

git diff --name-status origin/master | grep '\.php$' | grep -v "^[RD]" | awk '{ print $2 }'

```

These scripts can easily be tested in your local environment ( at least if you have a Linux machine, that is ;-) ).

Now, as we have our first check, we'll finally create our `.gitlab-ci.yml`. This is where your pipeline is declared using [YAML notation](https://yaml.org/):

```yml

# we're using this beautiful tool for our pipeline: https://github.com/jakzal/phpqa

image: jakzal/phpqa:alpine

# For this sample pipeline, we'll only have 1 stage, in real-world you would like to also add at least "deploy"

stages: - QA

linter:

stage: QA

# this is the main part: what is actually executed

script: - sh ci/get-changed-php-files.sh | xargs sh ci/linter.sh

```

The first line is `image: jakzal/phpqa:alpine` and it's telling Gitlab that we want to run our pipeline using a PHP-QA utility by [jakzal](https://github.com/jakzal). It is a docker image containing PHP and a huge variety of QA-tools. We declare one stage - QA, and this stage by now has just a single job named `linter`. Every job can have it's own docker image, but we don't need that for the purpose of this tutorial. Our project reaches [Step 2](https://gitlab.com/crocodile2u/ci-showcase/tree/step-2). Once I had pushed these changes, I immediately went to the [project's CI/CD page](https://gitlab.com/crocodile2u/ci-showcase/pipelines). Aaaand.... the pipeline was already running! I clicked on the `linter` job and saw the following happy green output:

```

Running with gitlab-runner 11.9.0-rc2 (227934c0) on docker-auto-scale ed2dce3a

Using Docker executor with image jakzal/phpqa:alpine ...

Pulling docker image jakzal/phpqa:alpine ...

Using docker image sha256:12bab06185e59387a4bf9f6054e0de9e0d5394ef6400718332c272be8956218f for jakzal/phpqa:alpine ...

Running on runner-ed2dce3a-project-11318734-concurrent-0 via runner-ed2dce3a-srm-1552606379-07370f92...

Initialized empty Git repository in /builds/crocodile2u/ci-showcase/.git/

Fetching changes...

Created fresh repository.

From https://gitlab.com/crocodile2u/ci-showcase * [new branch] master -> origin/master * [new branch] step-1 -> origin/step-1 * [new branch] step-2 -> origin/step-2

Checking out 1651a4e3 as step-2...

Skipping Git submodules setup

$ sh ci/get-changed-php-files.sh | xargs sh ci/linter.sh

Job succeeded

```

It means that our pipeline was successfully created and run!

### PHP Code Sniffer.

[PHP Code Sniffer](https://github.com/squizlabs/PHP_CodeSniffer) is a tool for keeping app of your PHP files in one uniform code style. It has a hell of customizations and settings, but here we will only perform simple check for compatibilty with [PSR-2](https://www.php-fig.org/psr/psr-2/) standard. A good practice is to create a configuration XML file in your project. I will put it in the root folder. Code sniffer can use a few file names, of which I prefer `phpcs.xml`:

```xml

<?xml version="1.0"?>

/resources

```

I also will append another section to `.gitlab-ci.yml`:

```yml

code-style: stage: QA script: # Variable $files will contain the list of PHP files that have changes - files=`sh ci/get-changed-php-files.sh` # If this list is not empty, we execute the phpcs command on all of them - if [ ! -z "$files" ]; then echo $files | xargs phpcs; fi

```

Again, we check only those PHP files that differ from master branch, and pass their names to `phpcs` utility. That's it, [Step 3](https://gitlab.com/crocodile2u/ci-showcase/tree/step-3) is finished! If you go to see the pipeline now, you will notice that `linter` and `code-style` jobs run in parallel.

## Adding PHPUnit

Unit and integration tests are essential for a successful and maintaiable modern software project. In PHP world, [PHPUnit](https://phpunit.de/) is de facto standard for these purposes. The PHPQA docker image already has PHPUnit, but that's not enough. Our project is based on [Laravel](https://laravel.com/), which means it depends on a bunch of third-party libraries, Laravel itself being one of them. Those are installed into `vendor` folder with [composer](https://getcomposer.org/). You might have noticed that our `.gitignore` file has `vendor` folder as one of it entries, which means that it is not managed by the Version Control System. Some prefer their dependencies to be part of their Git repository, I prefer to have only the `composer.json` declarations in Git. Makes the repo much much smaller than the other way round, also makes it easy to avoid bloating your production builds with libraries only needed for development.

Composer is also included into PHPQA docker image, and we can enrich our `.gitlab-ci.yml`:

```yml

test: stage: QA cache: key: dependencies-including-dev paths: - vendor/ script: - composer install - ./vendor/bin/phpunit

```

PHPUnit requires some configuration, but in the very beginning we used `composer create-project` to create our project boilerplate. **laravel/laravel** package has a lot of things included in it, and `phpunit.xml` is also one of them. All I had to do was to add another line to it:

```xml

```

APP_KEY enironment variable is essential for Laravel to run, so I generated a key with `php artisan key:generate`.

`git commit` & `git push`, and we have all three jobs on the **QA** stage!

## Checking that our checks work

In [this branch](https://gitlab.com/crocodile2u/ci-showcase/tree/failing-checks) I intentionally added changes that should fail all three job in our pipeline, take a look at [git diff](https://gitlab.com/crocodile2u/ci-showcase/compare/step-4...failing-checks). And we have this out from the pipeline stages:

**Linter**:

```

$ ci/linter.sh

PHP Linter is not happy about app/User.php:

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected 'syntax' (T_STRING), expecting function (T_FUNCTION) or const (T_CONST) in app/User.php on line 11

Errors parsing app/User.php

PHP syntax validation failed!

ERROR: Job failed: exit code 255

```

**Code-style**:

```

$ if [ ! -z "$files" ]; then echo $files | xargs phpcs; fi

FILE: ...ilds/crocodile2u/ci-showcase/app/Http/Controllers/Controller.php

----------------------------------------------------------------------

FOUND 0 ERRORS AND 1 WARNING AFFECTING 1 LINE

---------------------------------------------------------------------- 13 | WARNING | Line exceeds 120 characters; contains 129 characters

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Time: 39ms; Memory: 6MB

ERROR: Job failed: exit code 123

```

**test**:

```

$ ./vendor/bin/phpunit

PHPUnit 7.5.6 by Sebastian Bergmann and contributors.

F. 2 / 2 (100%)

Time: 102 ms, Memory: 14.00 MB

There was 1 failure:

1) Tests\Unit\ExampleTest::testBasicTest

This test is now failing

Failed asserting that false is true.

/builds/crocodile2u/ci-showcase/tests/Unit/ExampleTest.php:17

FAILURES!

Tests: 2, Assertions: 2, Failures: 1.

ERROR: Job failed: exit code 1

```

Congratulations, our pipeline is running, and we now have much less chance of messing up the result of our work.

## Conclusion

Now you know how to set up a basic QA pipeline for your PHP project. There's still a lot to learn. Pipeline is a powerful tool. For instance, it can make deployments to different environments for you. Or it can build docker images, store artifacts and more! Sounds cool? Then spend 5 minutes of your time and leave a comment, you can also tell me if there is a pipeline topic you would like to be covered in next posts.

SPONSORS

Faster PHP Cloud Hosting