What I Learned About Testing While
Walking Uphill Both Ways In The Snow

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July US

Presented by Chris Hartjes (@grmpyprogrammer)

Date: July 20, 2017
Time: 20:00 CDT

18:00 PDT, 3:00 CEST (July 21), 2:00 BST (July 21)
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Back when I was learning about how to test PHP code, I had to walk both ways uphill in the snow to get the information I needed. Over the past 14 years (has it really been that long?!?) I’ve learned a lot about not just testing but about code and people. In this talk I want to share what I wished I knew all those years ago so you don’t have to suffer like I did.

Chris Hartjes

Chris Hartjes

Chris Hartjes, aka The Grumpy Programmer has been building web applications of all shapes and sizes since 1998, with a focus on best practices and how to use testing as an effective development tool.

Monday to Thursday he works as a Staff Test Engineer for Mozilla’s Firefox Test Engineering team and on Friday’s he’s working on building his Grumpy Learning info-product empire. He also was one of the organizers of the now extinct TrueNorthPHP conference. Chris is co-host of the popular /dev/hell podcast.

 

Pieces of Auth

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June 2017

Presented by Chris Cornutt (@enygma)

Date: June 22, 2017
Time: 20:00 CDT

18:00 PDT, 3:00 CEST (June 23), 2:00 BST (June 23)
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There’s a lot to consider when it comes to the authentication and authorization methods your site uses. Let me guide you through some of the major (and minor) decisions you’ll need to make and how to find the right fit for your needs. Topics covered will include both traditional and advanced authentication methods, access control systems, credential storage and effective logging practices to help identify threats as they happen.

Chris Cornutt

For the last 10+ years, Chris has been involved in the PHP community in one way or another. These days he’s the Senior Editor of PHPDeveloper.org and curator of @phpquickfix, @jsquickfix and @websecquickfix. He’s written for several PHP publications and has spoken at conferences in both the U.S. and Europe and publishes security articles on his site Websec.io. He’s also an organizer of the Dallas PHP User Group and the Lone Star PHP Conference.

 

MySQL: Analysis, Understanding, and
Optimization of Queries

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May 2017

Presented by Michael Moussa (@michaelmoussa)

Date: May 18, 2017
Time: 20:00 CDT

18:00 PDT, 3:00 CEST (May 19). 2:00 BST (May 19)
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Your new database query ran quickly when you tested it, but seconds after deploying it, alarms are blaring and you’re scrambling to rollback before the site goes down. What happened?!?

I can “EXPLAIN”.

Queries that perform well under development load with limited datasets can easily bring a database to its knees under production load. In this talk, you will learn to decipher MySQL query execution plans, recognize portions that can be improved, and take the necessary steps to optimize your queries – all without starting any fires!

Michael Moussa

Michael Moussa

Michael has over 17 years experience building PHP applications from the ground up. He is a Solutions Architect on Rackspace’s Fanatical Support for AWS team helping customers solve their technical challenges and launch their products in the cloud. In his spare time, he’s a regular open-source contributor, Zend Expressive maintainer, and competitive homebrewer.

 

Does Your Code Measure Up?

April 2017

Presented by Adam Culp (@AdamCulp)

Date: April 20, 2017
Time: 20:00 CDT

18:00 PDT, 3:00 CEST (Apr 21), 2:00 BST (Apr 21)
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After days, weeks, or months of coding many developers don’t know how to gauge the quality of their code. I’ll introduce tools to grade, benchmark, and analyze PHP code in an automated fashion allowing developers to write better quality software. Then I’ll explain key metrics to help understand what may need to be refactored, and use code smells to point out bugs before end-users discover them. Attendees will see how to use these tools, know where to find them, and be able to implement them into their own workflows.

This meeting is over, but you can still purchase the video.

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Adam Culp

Adam Culp

Adam Culp a Zend consultant at Rogue Wave Software, is passionate about developing with PHP and contributes to many open source projects. He organizes the SunshinePHP Developer Conference and the South Florida PHP Users Group (SoFloPHP) where he enjoys helping others write good code, implement standards, and refactor efficiently. He is a Zend Certified PHP 5.3 engineer, is a voting member of the PHP-Fig, and holds a seat on the Zend Framework Certification Advisory Board. You can also find him on his Run Geek Radio podcast and GeekyBoy technical blog. When he is not coding or contributing to various developer communities, he can be found hiking around the United States National Parks, teaching judo, or long(ultra) distance running.

Yielding Higher-Performance PHP Applications

March 2017 – US

Presented by Ian Littman (@iansltx)

Date: March 16, 2017
Time: 20:00 CDT

18:: PDT, 2:00 CET (Mar 17), 1:00 GMT (Mar 17)
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This meeting is over, but you can still purchase the video.

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Not long ago, there was one sane model for running web applications in PHP: handle one simultaneous request per process, build everything up at the beginning of the request, tear everything down at the end, and block on I/O everywhere along the way. That’s still the standard for PHP web applications. But with advances in the PHP runtime…and new concurrency frameworks like Icicle and AMPHP on top of those new features…PHP applications can behave a bit more like Node.js ones, with the application itself serving web requests…and outlasting them…interleaving multiple concurrent requests via async I/O. Those advances can pack more performance into a given application, handling more requests per second and taking less time per request than a more traditional setup.

We’ll take a look at the basic concepts powering this new wave of async frameworks (generators!), then dive into how you’d build an application that runs on top of those frameworks, including an example app that showcases what async I/O can do to shorten response times and squeeze more requests per second out of an all-elsse-equal hardware and software setup.

Ian Littman

Ian Littman

Ian has been building and maintaining various clients’ applications in some form or fashion since 2011.He prefers building APIs and the logic that powers them, though with enough arm-twisting he’s been known to build things that you can see in a browser outside its developer console. When he isn’t dev’ing, adding another event to the schedule for Austin Web Developer Lunch, or presenting yet again at AustinPHP, he’s playing fiddle…er…violin, biking around town, or losing Overwatch matches.