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3567 views · 2 years ago
Custom extension to Laravel Application class

Hello folks! This post is for those of you using Laravel. This beautiful framework makes web development super-easy compared to most of competitors. In the heart of Laravel is the Application class, which is responsible for bootstrapping, registering services and also serves as a dependency injection container. What I do with my Laravel apps, is that I take a slight detour from the common path by adding a custom Application class. While this is not really necessary, I find this approach nice, and will try to share my thought below.

It's normal practice in Laravel world to build all kinds of objects like this:

$cache = app("cache");


I find it a bit confusing to call app("cache"") and expect a Cache\Repository instance as result. If I pass the result of this call to a function that requires a Cache\Repository as parameter, I will probably have a code inspection warning from IDE. Moreover, if I want proper autocompletion, I will have to add additional comment:


$cache = app("cache");


This is where a custom application class might be handy:

namespace App;
class MyApp extends Application
{
public function cacheRepository(): Repository
{
return $this->make(Repository::class);
}
}


This way I get a TypeError in case of a misconfiguration, and I have a type-hint which allows the IDE to recognize the return value. Bye-bye nasty comment lines and IDE warnings! I make a method per service, with type-hints, like dbConnection() or viewFactory() - works really well for me!

I also thought that, if I have a custom class, then all the custom setup that normally you have in bootstrap/app.php, should reside in that custom class:

namespace App;
class MyApp extends Application
{
public function __construct()
{
define('LARAVEL_START', microtime(true));
define("APP_ROOT", realpath(__DIR__ . "/../"));
parent::__construct(APP_ROOT);
$this->setUp();
}
private function setUp()
{
$this->singleton(
Contracts\Http\Kernel::class,
\App\Http\Kernel::class
);
}
}


Then your bootstrap/app.php becomes just this:

return new \App\MyApp;


The Laravel app() function will also return an instance of MyApp from now on. However, it's @phpdoc says it returns \Illuminate\Foundation\Application, so for better clarity, I also added my own accessor method:

namespace App;
class MyApp extends Application
{
public static function app(): self
{

$ret = parent::getInstance();
return $ret;
}
}


I tend to limit the use of global/static functions and methods, but sometimes it can be handy, and whenever I need an instance of MyApp, I just call MyApp::app(). The IDE wil be aware of the return type due to the type-hint, so I get everything I want for clean and clear development.

With your projects in Laravel, you may or may not want to follow this particular advice, but just be aware that extending a framework built-in classes for your team's comfort, is definitely something that can make your life easier. See you around, don't forget to leave comments!

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