PHP & Web Development Blogs

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2538 views · 5 months ago

![Ideas to help your PHP dev team grow their skills](https:/ /cdn.filestackcontent.com/LcqSW9KZSZarYYZWaQVH)

> Your biggest asset is also your biggest risk... your developers

Your business thrives because of the incredible work and innovation of your developers. With simple keystrokes your developers can completely transform your business, add new features, and drive new sales.

But those same keystrokes can take down production, create security back doors, and put your business at risk. That's why it's more important than ever for your team members to be up to speed with the latest technology, especially around performance and security.

Of course, some things are easier said than done - after all everyone is super busy these days. So how can you help keep your team members learning, and putting your business first in the process?

## Conference Parties

There's nothing better than attending a [PHP or programming conference](https:/ /www.php.net/conferences/) in person - the chance to meet speakers face to face, to network, the knowledge, and the hallway track. However, many companies aren't able to afford multiple (or even one) conference for their developers - especially ones that require airfare and hotel.

However, that doesn't mean you shouldn't still participate in these conferences. The good news is that roughly once a quarter [Nomad PHP](/live) streams talks from a conference right to your computer. This means that your team members can all participate in a multi-day conference from the comfort of your office (or their home) - and you can provide this for your team for [less than the cost](/teams) of a single conference ticket!

Make the conference party even more special by providing lunch during the lunch break, bringing in party gifts, having give-aways during the conference, and planning activities during longer breaks for your team.

Since many conferences take place on Friday, not only are you providing invaluable training and an incredible work benefit, but ending the week on a super positive note that your team members will appreciate (and your risk assessment teams will greatly appreciate as new security practices and compliance practices are put into place).

## Monthly Lunch and Learns

Every month Nomad PHP offers [live virtual talks](/live) by the industry's top experts. With talks at 11am Pacific, and 6pm Pacific it's a perfect time to grab a conference room and order a couple pizzas for lunch (or if Eastern, grab some snacks and maybe a beer) and play the monthly meeting on the large screen.

Your team members will have the opportunity to take notes, discuss with each other, and perhaps most importantly ask the speaker real-world questions that directly impact your business, providing tangible solutions to the problems they are facing.

And since every Nomad PHP Pro meeting [is recorded](/videos), your team members can refer back to the video at any time, watching sections relevant to them or digging in for more information.

## Developer Book Club

Encourage your team members to share what they're learning with others, and help build each other up. Not only are you helping grow skills and ensure your team is following the latest best practices, but you're also fostering a mentor-mentality within your team - where each team member feels invested in the growth of other members.

With Nomad PHP you receive a new issue of [php[architect]](/books) each month and have several [additional books](/books) available to read on demand - providing the latest updates and an invaluable resource to help your book club get started.

## Developer Movie Nights

Sometimes we all just want to get away, grab some popcorn, and watch a movie. Similar to lunch and learns, give your developers a night or two where they can get together and watch one of the [250+ training videos](/videos) available on Nomad PHP. You can even make it a movie marathon!

Whether it's pizza, popcorn, sodas, beers - your team members will have the chance to kick back, relax a bit, build team camaraderie, and learn valuable skills to help your business succeed. Essentially, turning a training day into a fun team-bonding activity.

## Learning Path Challenges

Every company has challenges, and areas they need their team members to master. Whether it's [DevOps](/videos/devops) and [containerization](/videos/containerization), [security](/videos/security), [performance](/videos/performance), [management](/search/videos/soft-skills?search_query=manage), [modernization](/videos/upgrading), or [soft skills](/videos/soft-skills) - work with your team to determine what skills will help them succeed and work with your team members to put together video learning paths.

Your team members can watch through these [videos on-demand](/videos), go back and replay to refresh their knowledge, and work their way towards mastery in the subjects that will help your company succeed.

## Certification

Show that you are invested in your developers by helping them earn [Professional Certification](/certification). These certifications demonstrate that your team members have a fundamental grasp of the technology they are working with and understand when and how to use this technology.

With [free certification exams](/certification) included with Nomad PHP - you no longer have to worry about failed exams or expensive test credits. Your team members can take the exams at their own pace, discover the areas they need to improve, and take the exam again when they are ready. After all, shouldn't the goal of certification be to help your developers learn these skills and prove their expertise?

You can go even further with certifications by having a special [company award](https:/ /amzn.to/359HSLd), [framing their certificate](https:/ /amzn.to/2SnEOpV), or calling out newly certified developers at team meetings or all-hands.

## Learning Incentives/ Rewards

Of course there are even more ways you can help your developers learn new skills, grow their careers, and build loyalty within your company. With Nomad PHP there are numerous ways for your team members to grow their skills, and numerous ways you can reward/ incentivize them - from rewards for the most active learner, to setting goals for learning new skills, to obtaining certifications, to attending streams, to watching videos on-demand. All of these are included with our [Professional Nomad PHP Team subscriptions](/teams).

### Want to learn more about getting a Nomad Team Subscription for your developers? Give us a call (844) CODE-PHP

**Have more ideas on how to help your developers grow their skills or help employers make education more accessible? Please leave your ideas in the comments below!**

1408 views · 6 months ago

![Laravel Eloquent Relationship Part 2](https:/ /images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/3gY1sugUC3gTUtfgbhgNi5/410818aed6a8d4ea08e0ec796477291c/laravel_blog.png?w=1000)

As you all know, Laravel Eloquent Relationships are powerful and easy methods introduced by Laravel for helping developers to reduce the complexity when connecting with multiple tables. While connecting with multiple tables, this method is very easy for developers for creating the application

Here you can see the next three methods of the eloquent relationships:

1. Has Many Through Relationship

2. One to Many Polymorphic

3. Many to many Polymorphic

## HAS MANY THROUGH ELOQUENT RELATIONSHIP

Has many through is a little bit complicated while understanding. I will provide a shortcut method to provide access data of another mode relationship. We will create a user table, post table, and country table and they will be interconnected with each other.

Here we will see Many through relationship will use `hasManyThrough()` for the relation

### Create Migrations

**Users table**

```

Schema::create('users', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string('name');

$table->string('email')->unique();

$table->string('password');

$table->integer('country_id')->unsigned();

$table->rememberToken();

$table->timestamps();

$table->foreign('country_id')->references('id')->on('countries')

->onDelete('cascade');

});

```

**Posts table**

```

Schema::create('posts', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->integer('user_id')->unsigned();

$table->timestamps();

$table->foreign('user_id')->references('id')->on('users')

->onDelete('cascade');

});

```

**Countries table**

```

Schema::create('countries', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string('name');

$table->timestamps();

});

```

### Create Models

**Country Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Country extends Model

{

public function posts(){

return $this->hasManyThrough(

Post::class,

User::class,

'country_id', / / Foreign key on users table...

'user_id', / / Foreign key on posts table...

'id', / / Local key on countries table...

'id' / / Local key on users table...

);

}

}

```

**Now we can retrieve records by**

```

$country = Country::find(1);

dd($country->posts);

```

## ONE TO MANY POLYMORPHIC RELATIONSHIP

One to many polymorphic relationships used one model belongs to another model on a single file. For example, we will have tweets and blogs, both having the comment system. So we need to add the comments. Then we can manage both in a single table

Here we will use sync with a pivot table, create records, get all data, delete, update, and everything related to one too many relationships.

Now I will show one too many polymorphic will use `morphMany()` and `morphTo()` for relation.

### Create Migrations

**Posts table**

```

Schema::create('posts', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

**Videos Table**

```

Schema::create('videos', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

**Comments Table**

```

Schema::create('comments', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("body");

$table->integer('commentable_id');

$table->string("commentable_type");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

## Create Models

**Post Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Post extends Model

{

/ **

* Get all of the post's comments.

*/

public function comments(){

return $this->morphMany(Comment::class, 'commentable');

}

}

```

**Video Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Video extends Model{

/ **

* Get all of the post's comments.

*/

public function comments(){

return $this->morphMany(Comment::class, 'commentable');

}

}

```

**Comment Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Comment extends Model{

/ **

* Get all of the owning commentable models.

*/

public function commentable(){

return $this->morphTo();

}

}

```

### Create Records

```

$post = Post::find(1);

$comment = new Comment;

$comment->body = "Hi Harikrishnan";

$post->comments()->save($comment);

/ / Video

$video = Video::find(1);

$comment = new Comment;

$comment->body = "Hi Harikrishnan";

$video->comments()->save($comment);

```

Now we can retrieve records

```

$post = Post::find(1);

dd($post->comments);

$video = Video::find(1);

dd($video->comments);

```

## MANY TO MANY POLYMORPHIC RELATIONSHIPS

Many to many polymorphic is also a little bit complicated like above. If we have a tweet, video and tag table, we need to connect each table like every tweet and video will have multiple persons to tag. And for each and every tag there will be multiple tweet or videos.

Here we can understand the creating of many to many polymorphic relationships, with a foreign key schema of one to many relationships, use sync with a pivot table, create records, attach records, get all records, delete, update, where condition and etc..

Here `morphToMany()` and `morphedByMany()` will be used for many to many polymorphic relationships

### Creating Migrations

**Posts Table**

```

Schema::create('posts', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

**Videos Table**

```

Schema::create('videos', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

**Tags table**

```

Schema::create('tags', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->increments('id');

$table->string("name");

$table->timestamps();

});

```

**Taggables table**

```

Schema::create('taggables', function (Blueprint $table) {

$table->integer("tag_id");

$table->integer("taggable_id");

$table->string("taggable_type");

});

```

### Creating Models

**Post Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Post extends Model

{

/ **

* Get all of the tags for the post.

*/

public function tags(){

return $this->morphToMany(Tag::class, 'taggable');

}

}

```

**Video Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Video extends Model

{

/ **

* Get all of the tags for the post.

*/

public function tags(){

return $this->morphToMany(Tag::class, 'taggable');

}

}

```

**Tag Model**

```

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Tag extends Model

{

/ **

* Get all of the posts that are assigned this tag.

*/

public function posts(){

return $this->morphedByMany(Post::class, 'taggable');

}

/ **

* Get all of the videos that are assigned this tag.

*/

public function videos(){

return $this->morphedByMany(Video::class, 'taggable');

}

}

```

**Creating Records**

```

$post = Post::find(1);

$tag = new Tag;

$tag->name = "Hi Harikrishnan";

$post->tags()->save($tag);

$video = Video::find(1);

$tag = new Tag;

$tag->name = "Vishnu";

$video->tags()->save($tag);

$post = Post::find(1);

$tag1 = new Tag;

$tag1->name = "Kerala Blasters";

$tag2 = new Tag;

$tag2->name = "Manajapadda";

$post->tags()->saveMany([$tag1, $tag2]);

$video = Video::find(1);

$tag1 = new Tag;

$tag1->name = "Kerala Blasters";

$tag2 = new Tag;

$tag2->name = "Manajappada";

$video->tags()->saveMany([$tag1, $tag2]);

$post = Post::find(1);

$tag1 = Tag::find(3);

$tag2 = Tag::find(4);

$post->tags()->attach([$tag1->id, $tag2->id]);

$video = Video::find(1);

$tag1 = Tag::find(3);

$tag2 = Tag::find(4);

$video->tags()->attach([$tag1->id, $tag2->id]);

$post = Post::find(1);

$tag1 = Tag::find(3);

$tag2 = Tag::find(4);

$post->tags()->sync([$tag1->id, $tag2->id]);

$video = Video::find(1);

$tag1 = Tag::find(3);

$tag2 = Tag::find(4);

$video->tags()->sync([$tag1->id, $tag2->id]);

```

Now we can retrieve records

```

$post = Post::find(1);

dd($post->tags);

$video = Video::find(1);

dd($video->tags)

$tag = Tag::find(1);

dd($tag->posts);

$tag = Tag::find(1);

dd($tag->videos);

```

Hence we completed all the relationships. In the above blog how has many through relationship, one to many polymorphic relationships and many to many polymorphic are working. This feature is introduced from Laravel 5.0 onwards and till the current version. Without the model, we can’t able to do this relationship. If we are using an eloquent relationship it will be very useful while developing an application.

1522 views · 6 months ago

![](https:/ /cdn.filestackcontent.com/Ve0Q3jp4S4KuL2N4Mub7)

#### Welcome back! If you’re new to this series have a look at [Part 1 here](https:/ /nomadphp.com/blog/1925/code-with-me-challenge-custom-cms-development-with-php-and-mysql)

Today’s focus is on templating, the aesthetic that will make or break your web application.

Having a clean design with well defined CSS that’s responsive and user friendly goes a long way.

Developers often stick to their lane but delving into templating will bode in your favor, you can indeed

create a functional and launch-worthy application all on your own!

Let’s jump into it!

## Structured structure

Everything you tackle should be found with ease down the line. Therefore careful planning is fundamental to the success and sustainability of your project. You’ll also find that clearly defining your work lends itself to more productivity overall as you spend less that explaining your work during a handover / looking for a specific piece of code or resource. You’ll probably end up spending more time on actual work.

Finding your own unique pattern with file structure and CSS identifiers will also work in your favor as something unique to your process will most likely be easier to remember and form a tactile relationship with.

Our project’s current structure looks like this:

![](https:/ /cdn.filestackcontent.com/yvGBC8qbRMmsHklihrq2)

>If you need to backtrack, [Part 1](https:/ /nomadphp.com/blog/1925/code-with-me-challenge-custom-cms-development-with-php-and-mysql) is a great place to start!

In part 1, we created our index.php which displays info from our database.

Let’s take this a step further and create a header and a footer for our index.php

Create a file called header.php and save this to your includes folder.

Next, create a file called footer.php and save this to your includes folder.

Your file structure should now look like this.

![](https:/ /cdn.filestackcontent.com/8xTDBQkrTtSoZHC1aW5o)

### A header above all the rest

The header file will be a file we reuse throughout your web application. This file will contain important information that’s vital to the functionality and aesthetic of your website.

The type of info you’ll expect to see in a header.php file:

Script includes

Such as JQuery and important libraries

CSS includes

CSS files loaded from internal or external sources

Meta information

Contains important information that’s readable by search engines.

The basic structure of the beginning of your app, including your menu, and your logo.

For now, how header is going to have a basic layout.

Let’s get our HTML on!

```

<html>

<head>

<title>My Awesome CMS – Page Title</title>

</head>

<body>

```

### A footer that sets the bar

Create a file called footer.php and save it to your includes folder (yourcms/includes/footer.php).

Add this code to your new file.

```

</body>

</html>

```

### Next, let’s focus on the gravy… The CSS

CSS, when written beautifully, can truly set you apart.

You can tell your web application to load various styles to specific elements by defining unique identifiers.

Styles that are only used once are denoted with a # (a CSS “ID”) whereas styles that are reused multiple times are denoted with a . (a CSS “class”)

The best way to delve into the realm of CSS is to learn by experience.

### Let’s create!

First, we need to create and load our CSS file. Remember our nifty new pal header.php? This created a convenient way to load our CSS file!

Add the following code to your header.php just above the `</head>` tag.

```

<link href=”../assets/css/style.css” type=”text/css” rel=”stylesheet”/>

```

The ../ in the link to our stylesheet means we have to leave the current directory (the directory that header.php is in) and look for the assets/css/ directories.

Go ahead and create the css folder under your assets folder.

Next we’re going to create some simple CSS to test things out.

### It’s time to add some style!

We are going to create two divs.

A div is a divider / section in HTML.

Add this to your index.php (located in your CMS’ root folder) above the `<?php` tag.

```

<div id="myfirstid"></div>

<div class="myfirstclass"></div>

<div class="myfirstclass"></div>

<div class="myfirstclass"></div>

<div class="myfirstclass"></div>

<div class="myfirstclass"></div>

```

Then, create a CSS file

Add this:

```

#myfirstid{

Background:lightblue;

Font-family:Arial;

Font-size:44px;

Font-weight: Bold;

}

.myfirstclass{

Font-size:15px;

Color: darkblue;

}

```

Save your newly created CSS to assets/css/ as style.css.

### Pulling it all together, let’s see what we can do!

Let’s apply what we just learned to our index.php. But first, we should add our header.php and footer.php files.

### Including everyone

Add this to the top of your index.php file:

```

include(‘includes/header.php’);

```

Remove the `<divs>` we used for practice earlier, we have something better in store!

Add this to the bottom of your index.php:

```

include(‘includes/footer.php’);

```

Next, let’s modify our code so we can add some style to the data we retrieve from our database.

Modify the following line:

```

foreach($getmydata as $mydata){ echo "Title: "; echo $mydata['title']; echo "<br/>"; echo "Content: "; echo $mydata['content']; echo "<br/>"; echo "Author: "; echo $mydata['author']; echo "<br/>"; echo "<br/>";

```

as follows:

```

?>

<div id=”myfirstid”>

<?php

foreach($getmydata as $mydata){

echo "<div class=”myfirstclass”>Title: ";

echo $mydata['title'];

echo "<br/>";

echo "Content: ";

echo $mydata['content'];

echo "<br/>";

echo "Author: ";

echo $mydata['author'];

echo "</div><br/><br/>";

}?>

</div>

<?php

```

Your full index.php should now look like this:

```

<?php

include('includes/header.php');

include('includes/conn.php');

if ($letsconnect -> connect_errno) { echo "Error " . $letsconnect -> connect_error;

}else{

$getmydata=$letsconnect -> query("SELECT * FROM content");

?>

<div id="myfirstid">

<?php

foreach($getmydata as $mydata){

echo "<div class=”myfirstclass”>Title: ";

echo $mydata['title'];

echo "<br/>";

echo "Content: ";

echo $mydata['content'];

echo "<br/>";

echo "Author: ";

echo $mydata['author'];

echo "</div><br/><br/>";

}

?>

</div>

<?php

}

$letsconnect -> close();

include('includes/footer.php');

?>

```

## Go ahead, test it out!

There’s a lot to unpack and I will break things down a little more during our next tutorial!

## Challenge

Study the final index.php and try to form a few theories about why closing a php tag is necessary before adding raw html.

## Next Up: #CodeWithMe Part 4: Building A Good Base

1818 views · 6 months ago

![](https:/ /cdn.filestackcontent.com/ZriVX3EQNqmKgVF9FEdy)

#### Welcome back!, if you’re new please be sure to read [Part 1 here](https:/ /nomadphp.com/blog/1925/code-with-me-challenge-custom-cms-development-with-php-and-mysql).

This tutorial will focus primarily on Security and will touch on how to plan functionality.

Planning out an application and seeing progress regularly is a good strategy as you are most likely to complete your tasks in a timely fashion with this approach.

Ready?, ok let’s jump into it!

### DISCLAIMER

> We highly recommend that you follow these tutorials on a localhost testing server like Uniserver. Read through [Part 1 here](https:/ /nomadphp.com/blog/1925/code-with-me-challenge-custom-cms-development-with-php-and-mysql) to look at our recommendations. These tutorials follow a phased approach and it is highly recommended that you do not make snippets of code live prior to completing this tutorial series.

## Where we left off – the serious stuff.

In the previous tutorial we saved variables to the database.

It’s important to note that further steps are needed to ensure that data transactions to / from the database are secure.

A great first step is to ensure that all POST data (data transmitted after a user clicks a form’s submit button) is sanitized.

## What we’re trying to prevent

One of the most common exploits is SQL Injection, an attack most commonly used to insert SQL into db queries. POST data that’s not sanitized leaves a huge security hole for malicious exploits. In some cases SQL injection can be leveraged to rage an all out assault on a server’s operating system.

A few examples of a basic version of what this might look like can be seen below.

![](https:/ /cdn.filestackcontent.com/GdjoE6bPRQOT582LSGNQ)

#### OUTCOME

This might delete your database table

![](https:/ /cdn.filestackcontent.com/MlAzWxaJQWqsy7MjFQiM)

#### OUTCOME

This might provide access to the entire user table and the password protected area/dashboard.

***Please note that there are various types of SQL injection techniques and I will delve into this during the course of this series.***

## So what exactly is sanitization and what does it do?

When sanitizing POST data, we are essentially looking for any special characters that are often used in SQL injection attacks.

In many ways, this tiny piece of code is the unsung superhero of many database driven applications.

## Let’s secure that POST data!

Navigate to your backend folder and open index.php

Locate the following line of code:

```

$sql = "INSERT INTO content(title,content,author)VALUES ('".$_POST["title"]."', '".$_POST["content"]."', '".$_POST["author"]."')";

```

Ok, let’s get to work.

Based on what I mentioned a few moments ago, it’s clear that our SQL statement is vulnerable so we need to sanitize the POST data pronto!

The method I will focus on first is $mysqli->real_escape_string. This will escape any special characters found in the POST data.

Add the following just above your $sql.

```php

$title = $letsconnect -> real_escape_string($_POST['title']);

$content = $letsconnect -> real_escape_string($_POST['content']);

$author = $letsconnect -> real_escape_string($_POST['author']);

```

Did you notice the use of `$letsconnect`? This was used because of our db connection defined in conn.php.

Our new query will look like this:

```

$sql = "INSERT INTO content (title,content,author) VALUES ('".$title."', '".$content."', '".$author."')";

```

Go ahead and replace the old `$sql`.

Phew!, we can breathe easy now.

## Next, let’s lighten things up a bit by focusing on functionality and aesthetics.

A phased approach is the best way to tackle projects of any size.

I tend to jot this down on paper before creating a more legible professional spec!.

Typically the phased approach lends itself to logical progression.

For example, over the next several days I will go over the following:

* Account Access

* The login process

* The registration process

* The password recovery process

* Frontend

* The look and feel

* Menus

* Sidebars

*Main Content

*Footer

* Backend

* Content Management

* Add/Edit/Delete

* Security

This will give us a good springboard to delve into more complex functionality.

The aesthetic I have in mind will be barebones at first with clean CSS practices (this will make life a whole lot easier when we have to make changes down the line!).

## Challenge :

Plan out your own CMS, think about the user interface and design choices you’d like to implement, and create a phased approach.

## Conclusion

I hope this tutorial encouraged you to think about security and understand one of the most common exploits. During the course of this series, you will receive the tools necessary to beef up security while maintaining your sanity!

#### Next up

##### CodeWithMe – Let’s go templating.

1947 views · 7 months ago

![](video=https:/ /videos.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/5DKxpRVNgl3rd0flgk51OU/39f8f17695d0234b8c2bc495d4a4fd83/Animated_Nomad.mp4)

At Nomad PHP our goal is to empower developers in building a habit of continuous learning - and that means we have a habit of continuous improvement ourselves. Here are just some of the things we've done this year (with much more coming down the road)!

## Website Redesign

We've refreshed the look and feel of Nomad PHP to better emphasize the goal of Nomad PHP - to help developers build a habit of continuous learning and grow their careers. This includes numerous usability enhancements as well as a focus on our new book library, blogs, and certification in addition to virtual meetups, workshops, conferences, and on-demand videos.

## Free Meetups

As technology has advanced, more and more meetups and usergroups are able to stream their local usergroup meetings.

As our goal has always been to make technology accessible, we are proud to provide free streaming technology for local user groups, and share local user group meetings on our live virtual meetup schedule.

Student and Professional subscribers will continue to have access to our monthly conference level Pro Talks, hands on virtual workshops, and live conference streams in addition to streams by local user groups.

You can find a list of all upcoming talks (free and Pro) on our [Live Meetings Page](/live), or [add your user group stream here](/addameetup).

## Free Subscriber Tier

As our mission has evolved from being the meetup for developers without a meetup group to building an inclusive community of PHP developers where you can network, grow your skills, and share your knowledge with others - we are excited to announce our new Free Tier.

With a free Nomad PHP account you can:

* Stream free meetups

* Watch ad-supported videos in SD

* Read PHP blogs and write your own

* Network with other PHP developers

[Create your free developer account](/signup) to get started.

## New Student Tier

To provide the best value, we've also restructured our plans to provide professional online meetings, workshops, and conference streaming to our Student Tier. This will allow students and new developers the chance to learn from the best speakers and top practioners and obtain entry level certifications at the best price possible.

However, with the addition of PHP Books and Magazines, and in order to provide the best value while keeping the Student plan affordable, new Student subscribers will not have access to the PHP Book and Magazine Library, or advanced certifications. These will now require a professional plan.

[Student plans start at $12.95/mo](/subscribe)

## PHP Books and Magazines

We're excited to announce that we have expanded our PHP library. In addition to the ability to read the latest issues of php[architect] magazine, Professional subscribers now have access to read PHP and web development books online.

We're excited to announce the availability of Chris Hartjes' book *The Grumpy Programmer's Guide to Testing PHP Applications,* as well as several titles from Notes for Professionals, and *Undisturbed REST: a Guide to Designing the Perfect API.*

More titles including exclusive titles will be made available for online reading soon.

You can view our entire [PHP Library here](/books).

## Blog Updates

We've received a lot of feedback on the blog writing process, and have upgraded several aspects of our blogging software. This includes the ability to save drafts prior to publishing, and the ability to upload, edit, and crop images and videos. We've also added some bug fixes for editing and writing code.

We're also excited to share that members with Student and Professional plans can now have their own **VLOG (video blog)** with the ability to screencast/ record video from your webcam within the blog.

To see the most recent blog posts, or write your own, visit the [Nomad PHP Blogs](/blogs).

## Certification Updates

We've updated our certifications for better usability and readability. We've also reworked some of the code samples and questions in our Level 1 PHP Certification exam.

You can find our available exams, test your skills, and obtain your Nomad PHP certification [here](/certification).

## Team Management

Our new team manager allows you to easily add or remove team members with your Nomad PHP team subscription. You'll also find real time metrics on how your team is using Nomad PHP, who on your team is investing in their growth and streaming meetups, watching videos, reading books, and earning certifications, and the overall content value consumed by your team.

The Team Manager is available to new teams, and will be made available to existing team managers over the next several weeks.

## 2020 Roadmap

There's still plenty of more great things coming in 2020. Here are the items at the top of our list:

* Mobile app for offline viewing

* Desktop app for offline viewing

* Nomad PHP member only books

* PHP Level 2 Certification

* Interactive tutorials

* Better video support in blogs

* Ability to schedule blog posts

* Meeting software for local usergroups

* Improved plan management for subscribers

**Of course, what's most important to us is what's most important to you. Leave what you want to see on Nomad PHP in the comments below and if we're able to we'll get it added to our roadmap!**

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