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7788 views · 2 years ago

![Why Cloudways is the Perfect Managed Hosting for PHP Applications](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/3VLCUBagZPfSLyxyt1AvvP/89e3b904a450454545eb885e2e0e76b4/cloudways.jpg?w=1000)

#### The following is a sponsored blogpost by [Cloudways](https://www.cloudways.com/en/?id=431739)

Developing an application is not the sole thing you should bank on. You must strive to find the best hosting solution to deploy that application also. The application’s speed is dependent on the hosting provider, that is why I always advise you to go for the best hosting solution to get the ultimate app performance.

Now a days, it is a big challenge to choose any web hosting, as each hosting has its own pros and cons which you must know, before considering it finally for the deployment. I don’t recommend shared hosting for PHP/Laravel based applications, because you always get lot of server hassles like downtime, hacking, 500 errors, lousy support and other problems that are part and parcel of shared hosting.

For PHP applications, you must focus on more technical aspects like caching, configs, databases, etc. because these are essential performance points for any vanilla or framework-based PHP application. Additionally, if the app focuses on user engagement (for instance, ecommerce store), the hosting solution should be robust enough to handle spikes in traffic.

Here, I would like to introduce Cloudways [PHP server hosting](https://www.cloudways.com/en/php-cloud-hosting.php?id=431739) to you which provides easy, developer and designer friendly managed hosting platform. With Cloudways, you don't need to focus on PHP hosting, but must focus on building your application. You can easily launch cloud servers on five providers including DigitalOcean, Linode, Vultr, AWS and GCE.

### Cloudways ThunderStack

Being a developer, you must be familiar with the concept of stack - an arrangement of technologies that form the underlying hosting solution.

To provide a blazing fast speed and a glitch-free performance, Cloudways has built a PHP stack, known as ThunderStack. This stack consists of technologies that offer maximum uptime and page load speed to all PHP applications. Check out the following visual representation of ThunderStack and the constituent technologies:

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/5v08m0nwsFPv7niXjmRX0M/ca3aba8d814578baf676bd58c3933dc8/cloudways_image1.png?w=1000)

As you can see, ThunderStack comprises of a mix of static and dynamic caches with two web servers, Nginx and Apache. This combination ensures the ultimate experience for the users and visitors of your application.

### Frameworks and CMS

The strength and popularity of PHP lies in the variety of frameworks and CMS it offers to the developers. Realizing this diversity, Cloudways offers a hassle-free installation of major PHP frameworks including Symfony, Laravel, CakePHP, Zend, and Codeigniter. Similarly, popular CMS such as WordPress, Bolt, Craft, October, Couch, and Coaster CMS - you can install these with the 1-click option. The best part is that if you have a framework or CMS that is not on the list, you can easily install it through Composer.

### 1-Click PHP Server & Application Installation

Setting up a stack on an unmanaged VPS could take an entire day!

When you opt for Cloudways managed cloud hosting, the entire process of setting up the server, installation of core PHP files and then the setup of the required framework is over in a matter of minutes.

Just [sign up at Cloudways](https://www.cloudways.com/en/?id=431739), choose your desired cloud provider, and select the PHP stack application.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/2Dp11Kg9FOkHkFbjUub7Tj/f0c4c125a8c683c51a548fdd287c8330/cloudways_image2.png?w=1000)

As you can see, your LAMP stack is ready for business in minutes.

Many PHP applications fail because essential services are either turned off or not set up properly. Cloudways offers a centralized location where you can view and set the status of all essential services such as:

* Apache

* Elasticsearch

* Memcached

* MySQL

* PHP-FPM

* Nginx

* New Relic

* Redis

* Varnish

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/1zvZI0b7zuPbBacp4ALAax/a5150babfbe2972c96beca3ac71395f2/cloudways_image3.png?w=1000)

Similarly, you can manage SMTP add-ons without any fuss.

### Staging Environment

With Cloudways, you can test your web applications for possible bugs and errors before taking it live.

Using the staging feature, developers can first deploy their web sites on test domains where they can analyze the applications performance and potential problems. This helps site administrators to fix those issues timely and view the application performance in real-time.

A default sub domain comes pre-installed with the newly launched application, making it easy for the administrators to test the applications on those testing subdomains. Overall, it's a great feature which helps developers know about the possible errors that may arise during the live deployment.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/5gTrIsw9KjhocjtZMWVePB/a8274899ee55d7068329c551af362fdf/cloudways_image4.png?w=1000)

### Pre-Installed Composer & Git

PHP development requires working with external libraries and packages. Suppose you are working with Laravel and you need to install an external package. Since Composer has become the standard way of installing packages, it comes preinstalled on the Cloudways platform. Just launch the application and start using Composer in your project.

Similarly, if you are familiar with Git and maintain your project on GitHub or BitBucket, you don’t need to worry about Git installation. Git also comes pre-configured on Cloudways. You can start running commands right after application launch.

### Cloudways MySQL Manager

When you work with databases in PHP, you need a database manager. On the Cloudways platform, you will get a custom-built MySQL manager, in which you can perform all the tasks of a typical DB manager.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/415qced8tKK8FWEsWGPhAm/ec1947d0b21ac8cd572613d0a1fa88dc/cloudways_image5.png?w=1000)

However, if you wish to install and use another database manager like PHPMyAdmin, you can install it by following this simple guide on installing [PHPMyadmin](https://www.cloudways.com/blog/installation-phpmyadmin/?id=431739).

### Server & Application Level SSH

If you use Linux, you typically use SSH for accessing the server(s) and individual applications. A third-party developer requires application and server level access as per the requirements of the client. Cloudways offers SSH access to fit the requirements of the client and users.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/1IpSR4TrckMFJjYQ1m5upz/030f71f106b7db97ce16de10aba2c17b/cloudways_image6.png?w=1000)

### PHP-FPM, Varnish & Cron Settings

Cloudways provides custom UI panel to set and maintain PHP-FPM and Varnish settings. Although the default configuration is already in place, you can easily change all the settings to suit your own, particular development related requirements. In Varnish settings, you can define URL that you want to exclude from caching. You can also set permissions in this panel.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/2W8XQvGa3CZAPBwUY4sqca/8a6b041c6dc850cc2715bb19eb17a464/cloudways_image7.png?w=1000)

Cron job is a very commonly used component of PHP application development process. On Cloudways platform, you can easily set up Cron jobs in just a few clicks. Just declare the PHP script URL and the time when the script will run.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/32fN2IkC1X3HEC2Ly685nz/6fb9607bab9beaa81bff1b7fe4061edf/cloudways_image8.png?w=1000)

### Cloudways API & Personal Assistant Bot

Cloudways provides an internal API that offers all important aspects of the server and application management. Through Cloudways API, you can easily develop, integrate, automate, and manage your servers and web apps on Cloudways Platform using the RESTful API. Check out some of the [use cases developed](https://www.cloudways.com/blog/category/use-cases/api/?id=431739) using Cloudways API. You just need your API key and email for authentication of the HTTP calls on API Playground and custom applications.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/5Uxx5XySaV2um2AnJjvbcg/0a4e997995d6644aa90c850a41db2720/cloudways_image9.png?w=1000)

Cloudways employs a smart assistant named CloudwaysBot to notify all users about server and application level issues. CloudwaysBot sends the notifications on pre-approved channels including email, Slack and popular task management tools such as Asana and Trello.

### Run Your APIs on PHP Stack

Do you have your own API which you want to run on the PHP stack? No problem, because you can do that, too with Cloudways! You can also use REST API like [Slim](https://www.cloudways.com/blog/simple-rest-api-with-slim-micro-framework/?id=431739&utm_source=phpjabber&utm_medium=referral), [Silex](https://www.cloudways.com/blog/create-rest-api-silex/?utm_source=phpjabber&utm_medium=referral&id=431739), [Lumen](https://www.cloudways.com/blog/creating-rest-api-with-lumen/?utm_source=phpjabber&utm_medium=referral&id=431739), and others. You can use APIs to speed up performance and require fast servers with lots of resources. So, if you think that your API response time is getting slower due to the large number of requests, you can easily scale your server(s) with a click to address the situation.

### Team Collaboration

When you work on a large number of applications with multiple developers, you need to assign them on any specific application. Cloudways provides an awesome feature of team collaboration through which you can assign developers to specific application and give access to them. You can use this tool to assign one developer to multiple applications. Through team feature, you can connect the team together and work on single platform. Access can be of different type; i.e. billing, support and console. You can either give the full access or a limited one by selecting the features in Team tab.

![alt_text](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/3Yn7GSeHrLvSbPf42RTR2n/269328c371e80f3ac87984cf46b6e9ac/cloudways_image10.png?w=1000)

### Final Words

Managed cloud hosting ensures that you are not bothered by any hosting or server related issues. For practical purposes, this means that developers can concentrate on writing awesome code without worrying about underlying infrastructure and hosting related issues. Do [sign up](https://www.cloudways.com/en/?id=431739) and check out Cloudways for the best and the most cost-effective cloud hosting solution for your next PHP project!

6950 views · 2 years ago

![Working With Thin Controller And Fat Model Concept In Laravel](https://images.ctfassets.net/vzl5fkwyme3u/18L41PfcrcYYkM0qAsCous/7caca26b8cfb5a643d8cb16b14ae5eae/AdobeStock_147870533.jpeg?w=1000)

Models and controllers are one of the most essential programming handlers in the Laravel MVC framework, and both are used vastly for different functional operations. Models in Laravel are created inside the app folder and are mostly used to interact with the database using Eloquent ORM, while the controllers are located inside the directory App/Http/Controllers.

As a programmer, you should have the knowledge how to keep the balance in between the programming usage of Models and controllers. As which one should be more utilized for allowing functional tasks in applications deployed on any [PHP MySQL hosting](https://www.cloudways.com/en/php-cloud-hosting.php).

## What is the Concept of Thin Controller and FAT Models

The concept of the thin controller and fat model is that we do less work in our controllers and more work in our models. Like we use our controllers to validate our data and then pass it to the models. While in models, we define our actual functional logic and main coding operations of the desired application. This code structuring process is also a very basic concept of MVC and also the differentiating factor from the conventional complex programming which we mistakenly ignore sometimes.

## Why FAT Controllers Are Bad For Handling Code

Controllers are always meant to be defined short and concise, and it should only be used for receiving requests and return responses to it. Anything else further should be programmed in Models, which is actually made for main functional operations.

Placing functional logic in controllers can be bad for many reasons for your applications deployed on any _hosting for PHP_. As it not only makes code structure long but also makes it complex sometimes. Further placing code in Controllers is also not recommended because if same functionality is needed somewhere else in route, then pulling out the whole code from their becomes difficult and so its reusability in the application.

Though Laravel is an MVC framework while developing on laravel, we sometimes ignore this and write mostly all our code including the extending of App\Model and all our functional logic in controller route methods. What we can do here is we can create a sub model of our parent model. For example, our parent model is User then we can create another sub model of username in CustomerModel if you are using the same User model for all types of users. In this model, we will write all the logic related to user type Customer.

So now let's take an example of my existing blog creating comment system with laravel and vuejs. In that article, you can see I have made so much mess in my controller methods. Mostly, I have written all my comments logic in my methods, so to shorten that let's clean them in this article. Inside app folder, I will create a new file with name CommentModel.php. Inside this file, I will write my whole logic for comment functions. This is my basic file:

```php

<?php

namespace App;

use App\Comment;

use App\CommentVote;

use App\CommentSpam;

use App\User;

use Auth;

class CommentModel

{

}

?>

```

Right now it contains no function but has the reference of all my models which I required for this model. Let's first add a function named **getallcomments** passing **$pageId** as a parameter inside it. The function will get all the comments for the given page:

```php

public function getAllComments($pageId)

{

$comments = Comment::where('page_id',$pageId)->get();

$commentsData = [];

foreach ($comments as $key) {

$user = User::find($key->users_id);

$name = $user->name;

$replies = $this->replies($key->id);

$photo = $user->first()->photo_url;

/ / dd($photo->photo_url);

$reply = 0;

$vote = 0;

$voteStatus = 0;

$spam = 0;

if(Auth::user()){

$voteByUser = CommentVote::where('comment_id',$key->id)->where('user_id',Auth::user()->id)->first();

$spamComment = CommentSpam::where('comment_id',$key->id)->where('user_id',Auth::user()->id)->first();

if($voteByUser){

$vote = 1;

$voteStatus = $voteByUser->vote;

}

if($spamComment){

$spam = 1;

}

}

if(sizeof($replies) > 0){

$reply = 1;

}

if(!$spam){

array_push($commentsData,[

"name" => $name,

"photo_url" => (string)$photo,

"commentid" => $key->id,

"comment" => $key->comment,

"votes" => $key->votes,

"reply" => $reply,

"votedByUser" =>$vote,

"vote" =>$voteStatus,

"spam" => $spam,

"replies" => $replies,

"date" => $key->created_at->toDateTimeString()

]);

}

}

$collection = collect($commentsData);

return $collection->sortBy('votes');

}

```

Now I will create another function named **replies** which takes **$commentId** as a parameter. The function is more or less programmed in the same manner as the upper function get all comments.

```php

protected function replies($commentId)

{

$comments = Comment::where('reply_id',$commentId)->get();

$replies = [];

foreach ($comments as $key) {

$user = User::find($key->users_id);

$name = $user->name;

$photo = $user->first()->photo_url;

$vote = 0;

$voteStatus = 0;

$spam = 0;

if(Auth::user()){

$voteByUser = CommentVote::where('comment_id',$key->id)->where('user_id',Auth::user()->id)->first();

$spamComment = CommentSpam::where('comment_id',$key->id)->where('user_id',Auth::user()->id)->first();

if($voteByUser){

$vote = 1;

$voteStatus = $voteByUser->vote;

}

if($spamComment){

$spam = 1;

}

}

if(!$spam){

array_push($replies,[

"name" => $name,

"photo_url" => $photo,

"commentid" => $key->id,

"comment" => $key->comment,

"votes" => $key->votes,

"votedByUser" => $vote,

"vote" => $voteStatus,

"spam" => $spam,

"date" => $key->created_at->toDateTimeString()

]);

}

}

$collection = collect($replies);

return $collection->sortBy('votes');

}

```

Now lets create a function **create comment **which passes **$array** as a parameter in it:

```php

public function createComment($arary)

{

$comment = Comment::create($array);

if($comment)

return [ "status" => "true","commentId" => $comment->id ];

else

return [ "status" => "false" ];

}

```

Similarly, Now I will create all the function for comment in my **CommentModel**, so that all the functions gets accumulated in one model.

```php

<?php

namespace App;

use App\Comment;

use App\CommentSpam;

use App\CommentVote;

use App\User;

use Auth;

class CommentModel

{

public function getAllComments($pageId)

{

$comments = Comment::where('page_id', $pageId)->get();

$commentsData = [];

foreach ($comments as $key) {

$user = User::find($key->users_id);

$name = $user->name;

$replies = $this->replies($key->id);

$photo = $user->first()->photo_url;

/ / dd($photo->photo_url);

$reply = 0;

$vote = 0;

$voteStatus = 0;

$spam = 0;

if (Auth::user()) {

$voteByUser = CommentVote::where('comment_id', $key->id)->where('user_id', Auth::user()->id)->first();

$spamComment = CommentSpam::where('comment_id', $key->id)->where('user_id', Auth::user()->id)->first();

if ($voteByUser) {

$vote = 1;

$voteStatus = $voteByUser->vote;

}

if ($spamComment) {

$spam = 1;

}

}

if (sizeof($replies) > 0) {

$reply = 1;

}

if (!$spam) {

array_push($commentsData, [

"name" => $name,

"photo_url" => (string) $photo,

"commentid" => $key->id,

"comment" => $key->comment,

"votes" => $key->votes,

"reply" => $reply,

"votedByUser" => $vote,

"vote" => $voteStatus,

"spam" => $spam,

"replies" => $replies,

"date" => $key->created_at->toDateTimeString(),

]);

}

}

$collection = collect($commentsData);

return $collection->sortBy('votes');

}

protected function replies($commentId)

{

$comments = Comment::where('reply_id', $commentId)->get();

$replies = [];

foreach ($comments as $key) {

$user = User::find($key->users_id);

$name = $user->name;

$photo = $user->first()->photo_url;

$vote = 0;

$voteStatus = 0;

$spam = 0;

if (Auth::user()) {

$voteByUser = CommentVote::where('comment_id', $key->id)->where('user_id', Auth::user()->id)->first();

$spamComment = CommentSpam::where('comment_id', $key->id)->where('user_id', Auth::user()->id)->first();

if ($voteByUser) {

$vote = 1;

$voteStatus = $voteByUser->vote;

}

if ($spamComment) {

$spam = 1;

}

}

if (!$spam) {

array_push($replies, [

"name" => $name,

"photo_url" => $photo,

"commentid" => $key->id,

"comment" => $key->comment,

"votes" => $key->votes,

"votedByUser" => $vote,

"vote" => $voteStatus,

"spam" => $spam,

"date" => $key->created_at->toDateTimeString(),

]);

}

}

$collection = collect($replies);

return $collection->sortBy('votes');

}

public function createComment($arary)

{

$comment = Comment::create($array);

if ($comment) {

return ["status" => "true", "commentId" => $comment->id];

} else {

return ["status" => "false"];

}

}

public function voteComment($commentId, $array)

{

$comments = Comment::find($commentId);

$data = [

"comment_id" => $commentId,

'vote' => $array->vote,

'user_id' => $array->users_id,

];

if ($array->vote == "up") {

$comment = $comments->first();

$vote = $comment->votes;

$vote++;

$comments->votes = $vote;

$comments->save();

}

if ($array->vote == "down") {

$comment = $comments->first();

$vote = $comment->votes;

$vote--;

$comments->votes = $vote;

$comments->save();

}

if (CommentVote::create($data)) {

return true;

}

}

public function spamComment($commentId, $array)

{

$comments = Comment::find($commentId);

$comment = $comments->first();

$spam = $comment->spam;

$spam++;

$comments->spam = $spam;

$comments->save();

$data = [

"comment_id" => $commentId,

'user_id' => $array->users_id,

];

if (CommentSpam::create($data)) {

return true;

}

}

}

?>

```

Now we have all our required methods in **CommentModel**. So now let's clean up **CommentController** which is currently bit complex and lengthy in code structure. As right now **CommentController **look like this:

```php

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers;

use Illuminate\Http\Request;

use App\Http\Requests;

use App\Comment;

use App\CommentVote;

use App\CommentSpam;

use App\User;

use Auth;

class CommentController extends Controller

{

/ **

* Get Comments for pageId

*

* @return Comments

*/

public function index($pageId)

{

/ /

$comments = Comment::where('page_id',$pageId)->get();

$commentsData = [];

foreach ($comments as $key) {

$user = User::find($key->users_id);

$name = $user->name;

$replies = $this->replies($key->id);

$photo = $user->first()->photo_url;

/ / dd($photo->photo_url);

$reply = 0;

$vote = 0;

$voteStatus = 0;

$spam = 0;

if(Auth::user()){

$voteByUser = CommentVote::where('comment_id',$key->id)->where('user_id',Auth::user()->id)->first();

$spamComment = CommentSpam::where('comment_id',$key->id)->where('user_id',Auth::user()->id)->first();

if($voteByUser){

$vote = 1;

$voteStatus = $voteByUser->vote;

}

if($spamComment){

$spam = 1;

}

}

if(sizeof($replies) > 0){

$reply = 1;

}

if(!$spam){

array_push($commentsData,[

"name" => $name,

"photo_url" => (string)$photo,

"commentid" => $key->id,

"comment" => $key->comment,

"votes" => $key->votes,

"reply" => $reply,

"votedByUser" =>$vote,

"vote" =>$voteStatus,

"spam" => $spam,

"replies" => $replies,

"date" => $key->created_at->toDateTimeString()

]);

}

}

$collection = collect($commentsData);

return $collection->sortBy('votes');

}

protected function replies($commentId)

{

$comments = Comment::where('reply_id',$commentId)->get();

$replies = [];

foreach ($comments as $key) {

$user = User::find($key->users_id);

$name = $user->name;

$photo = $user->first()->photo_url;

$vote = 0;

$voteStatus = 0;

$spam = 0;

if(Auth::user()){

$voteByUser = CommentVote::where('comment_id',$key->id)->where('user_id',Auth::user()->id)->first();

$spamComment = CommentSpam::where('comment_id',$key->id)->where('user_id',Auth::user()->id)->first();

if($voteByUser){

$vote = 1;

$voteStatus = $voteByUser->vote;

}

if($spamComment){

$spam = 1;

}

}

if(!$spam){

array_push($replies,[

"name" => $name,

"photo_url" => $photo,

"commentid" => $key->id,

"comment" => $key->comment,

"votes" => $key->votes,

"votedByUser" => $vote,

"vote" => $voteStatus,

"spam" => $spam,

"date" => $key->created_at->toDateTimeString()

]);

}

}

$collection = collect($replies);

return $collection->sortBy('votes');

}

/ **

* Store a newly created resource in storage.

*

* @param \Illuminate\Http\Request $request

* @return \Illuminate\Http\Response

*/

public function store(Request $request)

{

$this->validate($request, [

'comment' => 'required',

'reply_id' => 'filled',

'page_id' => 'filled',

'users_id' => 'required',

]);

$comment = Comment::create($request->all());

/ / dd($comment);

if($comment)

return [ "status" => "true","commentId" => $comment->id ];

}

/ **

* Update the specified resource in storage.

*

* @param \Illuminate\Http\Request $request

* @param $commentId

* @param $type

* @return \Illuminate\Http\Response

*/

public function update(Request $request, $commentId,$type)

{

if($type == "vote"){

$this->validate($request, [

'vote' => 'required',

'users_id' => 'required',

]);

$comments = Comment::find($commentId);

$data = [

"comment_id" => $commentId,

'vote' => $request->vote,

'user_id' => $request->users_id,

];

if($request->vote == "up"){

$comment = $comments->first();

$vote = $comment->votes;

$vote++;

$comments->votes = $vote;

$comments->save();

}

if($request->vote == "down"){

$comment = $comments->first();

$vote = $comment->votes;

$vote--;

$comments->votes = $vote;

$comments->save();

}

if(CommentVote::create($data))

return "true";

}

if($type == "spam"){

$this->validate($request, [

'users_id' => 'required',

]);

$comments = Comment::find($commentId);

$comment = $comments->first();

$spam = $comment->spam;

$spam++;

$comments->spam = $spam;

$comments->save();

$data = [

"comment_id" => $commentId,

'user_id' => $request->users_id,

];

if(CommentSpam::create($data))

return "true";

}

}

/ **

* Remove the specified resource from storage.

*

* @param int $id

* @return \Illuminate\Http\Response

*/

public function destroy($id)

{

/ /

}

}?>

```

After cleaning up the controller it will look much simpler and easy to understand like this:

```php

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers;

use App\CommentModel;

use Illuminate\Http\Request;

class CommentController extends Controller

{

private $commentModel = null;

private function __construct()

{

$this->commentModel = new CommentModel();

}

/ **

* Get Comments for pageId

*

* @return Comments

*/

public function index($pageId)

{

return $this->commentModel->getAllComments($pageId);

}

/ **

* Store a newly created resource in storage.

*

* @param \Illuminate\Http\Request $request

* @return \Illuminate\Http\Response

*/

public function store(Request $request)

{

$this->validate($request, [

'comment' => 'required',

'reply_id' => 'filled',

'page_id' => 'filled',

'users_id' => 'required',

]);

return $this->commentModel->createComment($request->all());

}

/ **

* Update the specified resource in storage.

*

* @param \Illuminate\Http\Request $request

* @param $commentId

* @param $type

* @return \Illuminate\Http\Response

*/

public function update(Request $request, $commentId, $type)

{

if ($type == "vote") {

$this->validate($request, [

'vote' => 'required',

'users_id' => 'required',

]);

return $this->commentModel->voteComment($commentId, $request->all());

}

if ($type == "spam") {

$this->validate($request, [

'users_id' => 'required',

]);

return $this->commentModel->spamComment($commentId, $request->all());

}

}

}

?>

```

## Wrap Up!

So Isn't it looking much cleaner and simpler to understand now? This is what actually a thin controller and fat model looks like. We have all our logic related to Comment system programmed in our **CommentModel **and our controller is now just used to transfer data from the user to our model and returning the response which is coming from our model.

So this is how the structuring of the thin controller and fat model is made. Give your thoughts in the comments below.

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